12 Feb 2013: Photo Essay

To Catch a Rhino: Capturing
Animals in Order to Save Them

Six white rhinos were captured recently at a reserve in South Africa for eventual relocation to neighboring Botswana, which has lost its entire rhino population to poaching. E360 contributor Adam Welz joined the operation and produced a photo essay that documents the harrowing process.

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COMMENTS | POST A COMMENT


Thank you for explaining this process to us. Clearly written and beautifully photographed. Rhinos are incredibly large and intimidating animals!

(Many years ago, I and a couple of colleagues were chased by a rhino. Fortunately, we were able to out drive the animal.)

What education campaigns on this issue exist in Asia?

Posted by Georgia on 14 Feb 2013


What a lovely article!!

Posted by Mihaela Opreanu on 15 Feb 2013


Many years ago I witnessed black rhino translocation from the Zambesi valley to South Africa - a last ditch attempt to save the remnants of a decimated local population. It is hard to argue that translocation is a good thing, especially for the specific rhinos, but our collective lethargy and failure to create a value for wildlife beyond powdered products means that it is the best we can do. Good luck for the Botswana phase of this human-made and assisted migration.

Posted by Mark Dangerfield on 14 Mar 2013


After saving and breeding the rhinos, why introduce them into a high poaching area? Has Botswana become more secure for rhinos? I certainly hope that these animals survive. My species .... For every person that works to save animals, plants, people, there appears to be whole cities bent on uprooting, killing and destroying the same.

Posted by laurel mancini on 14 Aug 2013


More good reading from Adam Welz — always enjoy his writing. Hopefully he will get back to us with a follow-up on how the rhinos are doing a year from now. Is that the plan?
Posted by Lydia on 11 Oct 2013


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