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21 Aug 2013: Thai Monkeys May Abandon
Stone Tools Due to Human Disruptions

Human disturbances in Thailand’s Laem Son National Park may be causing Burmese long-tailed macaques to abandon their use of stone tools, say researchers studying the primates. The only monkeys

Click to enlarge
Burmese macaque stone tools

NTU
Burmese macaque cracks shells with a stone.
in Asia to use stone tools — and one of only three non-human primates worldwide to do so — these Burmese macaques have learned to use coastal rocks to crack the hard-shelled crabs, snails, and oysters that make up their diet. Habitat loss to rubber and oil palm farming, competition with humans for food sources, and threats from domestic dogs are forcing the macaques to change their foraging habits, researchers from Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University report. The monkeys are also showing signs of acclimating to humans and becoming dependent on human food sources. “Generally, when we think of conservation, we think of species preservation, but I think we must also be concerned with the preservation of rare and interesting behavior produced by animals’ cultures as well,” said Michael Gumert, the primatologist who led the study. “They require good conservation management of the habitats that foster these traditions.”


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