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18 Jan 2017: For Third Year in a Row, Earth
Experiences Record-Breaking Temperatures

Scientists confirmed this week that 2016 was the hottest year since record keeping began in 1880, marking the third consecutive year of record warmth across the globe. The average global surface temperature (over both land and ocean) in 2016 was 58.69 degrees F — 1.69 degrees above the 20th century average and 0.07 degrees above last year’s record. “That doesn't sound like a lot, but when you take that and you average it all the way around the planet, that's a big number," said Deke Arndt, the head of global climate monitoring at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Last year’s record status was confirmed in three separate analyses by scientists at NOAA, NASA, and the U.K. Met Office. According to NOAA, the annual global temperature record has been broken five times since the start of the 21st century.
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Republican Who Led EPA Urges
Confronting Trump on Climate

William K. Reilly, who was head of the EPA under President George H.W. Bush, is blunt in his assessment of the climate change deniers and anti-regulatory hawks
William K. Reilly

William K. Reilly
who have been nominated to fill many of President-elect Donald Trump’s top environmental posts. Reilly, a Republican, looks with special alarm on Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, nominated to run the EPA. “For a prospective EPA administrator to doubt or even contest a conclusion that 11 national academies of science have embraced is willful political obstruction,” says Reilly. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Reilly discusses how Trump administration threats to cut funding for NASA climate change research represent a “reckless head-in-the-sand posture,” explains why he believes former Exxon CEO Rex Tillerson may turn out to be one of the more enlightened environmental voices in the new administration, and urges EPA employees to stay and fight for the environment. “I would not advocate that committed people leave,” says Reilly. “We need them now more than ever.”
Read the interview.
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11 Jan 2017: First Carbon-Capture Coal
Plant in U.S. is Now Fully Operational

The first large-scale power plant in the U.S. that removes and stores carbon dioxide from coal combustion is now fully operating near Houston, Texas, capturing more than 1 million tons of CO2 annually. Operated by NRG Energy and JX Nippon Oil & Gas Exploration Corp., the Petra Nova plant — which cost more than $1 billion — extracts carbon dioxide from flue gases and then pipes them to the West Ranch oil field 80 miles away, where the CO2 helps extract additional oil from the ground. The U.S. Department of Energy, which provided $190 million in grants to the plant, called the facility “the world’s largest post-combustion carbon-capture system.” A second large carbon-capture plant is set to become operational in Mississippi by the end of the month. The Kemper Power Plant is designed to turn lignite, a type of coal, into a gas called syngas, removing some of the CO2 before the syngas is burned to generate electricity.
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10 Jan 2017: In a First, Bumble Bee
Is Listed as Endangered in Continental U.S.

The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has placed the rusty patched bumble bee, once common in 28 states and two Canadian provinces, on the endangered species list, the first bee

A rusty patched bumble bee in Wisconsin.
to receive such protection in the contiguous 48 states. Populations of the bee, which thrived in the grasslands and prairies of the upper Midwest and Northeast, have plummeted by 87 percent in recent decades, leaving scattered populations in 13 states and one Canadian province. The Fish & Wildlife Service said that without protection under the federal Endangered Species Act, the rusty patched bumble bee faces extinction. Scientists say the bee’s numbers have fallen sharply because of loss of habitat, disease and parasites, pesticide use, and a changing climate that affects the abundance of the flowers the bees depend upon. The service said it will work with state and local partners to restore habitat and take other steps to rebuild populations of the bee, a pollinator important to many crops and plants.
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06 Jan 2017: U.S. Likely to Become Exporter
Of Energy by 2026, New Report Says

The U.S. could become a major exporter of energy by 2026, if not sooner, as natural gas production increases and electricity demand

Solar panels in New Mexico.
flattens in the coming years, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) latest Annual Outlook released this week. The report also projects that renewables will grow faster than any other power source over the next three decades. But while electricity-related CO2 emissions are expected to fall as natural gas, wind, and solar increasingly power the grid, industrial and transportation emissions will likely increase. As a result, the EIA said, the country will not significantly reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and meet its pledges under the Paris Climate Agreement. Energy-related CO2 emissions fell an average 1.4 percent annually from 2005 to 2016. But according to the EIA report, that annual decline will likely average only 0.2 percent between 2016 and 2040.
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05 Jan 2017: Natural Disasters Caused $55
Billion in Damage in North America in 2016

North America was hit by 160 natural disasters in 2016, more than any other year since records began in 1980, according to an analysis by the global

A flooded Louisiana home in August 2016.
reinsurance firm Munich Re. The disasters — which included floods, wildfires, droughts, heat waves, and coastal storms — caused an estimated $55 billion in damage. Only 54 percent of those losses were insured, Munich Re said. Two of the world’s five most expensive natural catastrophes last year happened in North America — Hurricane Matthew in late September and major flooding in Louisiana in August. The U.S. alone experienced 19 major flood events in 2016, its highest number ever. Munich Re classifies a natural disaster as any event that caused at least $3 million in damage. “A look at the weather-related catastrophes of 2016 shows the potential effects of unchecked climate change,” Peter Höppe, head of Munich Re’s Geo Risks Research Unit, said.
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04 Jan 2017: Scientists Confirm Once Again
That Global Warming Hiatus Never Happened

Scientists have confirmed that global ocean temperatures have continued to rise over the past few decades — once again debunking

Sea surface temperature over the past decade.
the notion of a “hiatus” in global land and sea surface warming in the first 15 years of the 21st century. The new research, published this week in the journal Science Advances, was conducted by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley and the non-profit research institute Berkeley Earth. The study supports an earlier finding by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that buoy-based sensors report slightly cooler ocean temperatures than historical ship-based systems — which made it appear as though temperature increases had slowed as the bulk of data collection shifted from ships to the new technology. Using measurements from floating buoys, ocean-based observation stations, and satellites over the past two decades, the new study confirmed that global sea surface temperatures have risen 0.12 degrees C per decade over the last 19 years, nearly double the previous estimate of 0.07 degrees C per decade.
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27 Dec 2016: Scientists Take Closer Look
At CO2 Impacts of Forest Fragmentation

Researchers have discovered that fragments of temperate broadleaf forest in the northeastern U.S. absorb more carbon than expected along their edges. But the scientists also found that those forest edges are more susceptible to heat stress and that rising temperatures from climate change are likely to significantly reduce the ability of temperate woodlands to absorb CO2. Scientists from Boston University took core samples from 210 trees in 21 fragmented forest plots around Boston to gauge rates of growth and carbon sequestration. The higher-than-expected rates of CO2 absorption along forest edges was due to reduced competition among trees, enabling remaining hardwoods to rapidly grow and absorb CO2. But growth and CO2 uptake along those same forest edges, which are exposed to more wind and sun, slows considerable in hot weather, the researchers reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Interview: The Legacy of the Man
Who Changed Our View of Nature

He viewed nature as a web of life, and, in a conclusion stunning in its prescience, he named deforestation and “the great masses of steam and gas produced by industry”
Andrea Wulf

Andrea Wulf
as the causes of climate change. Yet the name of the 19th-century Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt has remained largely unknown in the English-speaking world in the modern era. Historian Andrea Wulf, in her best-selling book The Invention of Nature, aims to return Humboldt to his rightful place as, in her words, “the father of environmentalism.” In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Wulf explains how Humboldt originated an entirely new genre of writing that made science accessible to the masses, combining empirical observations with soaring language. Today’s environmentalists, she says, can find inspiration in Humboldt’s work. “When I look at today's environmental debate in the political arena, I'm really missing this sense of awe for nature, this recognition that we are only going to protect what we love.”
Read the interview.
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19 Dec 2016: U.S. Interior Department Updates
Coal Regulations to Protect Waterways

The Obama administration finalized a rule on Monday that strengthens protections for rivers, streams, and forests near coal mining facilities —

Coal waste downstream of a mine in Kentucky.
the first update to the Interior Department regulations in 33 years. The tougher guidelines require companies to avoid mining practices that could pollute streams and drinking water sources, as well as restore waterways and landscapes to their original state once mining is complete, according to Reuters. The Interior Department said the updated Stream Protection Rule would safeguard 6,000 miles of waterway and 52,000 acres of forest over the next two decades. It is likely to be one of the Obama administration’s last major environmental actions before leaving office, and one of President-elect Donald Trump’s earliest targets after inauguration. Trump has pledged to rebuild the U.S. coal industry, saying on the campaign trail that he would repeal any update to the stream protection rule if elected.
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15 Dec 2016: New NASA Visualization Shows
How CO2 Moves Around in the Atmosphere

Scientists at NASA have created a striking new video animation that shows exactly how carbon dioxide moves through the atmosphere

The movement of CO2 across the globe.
and across the globe — helping better explain how much CO2 stays in the atmosphere after being emitted, how long it stays there, and where it goes. That information, said NASA carbon cycle scientist Lesley Ott, will help improve researchers’ understanding of future climate change. The new 3-D visualization uses more than 100,000 measurements of CO2 taken daily from September 2014 to September 2015. It shows the rise and fall of CO2 throughout the seasons, the influence of geological structures like mountains, and the impact of highly productive ecosystems like the corn belt in the U.S. “There's still a long way to go, but this is a really important and necessary step in that chain of discoveries about carbon dioxide,” said Ott.
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14 Dec 2016: Fearing Trump, Scientists
Rush to Preserve Key Climate Data Sets

Scientists in the U.S., aided by colleagues in Canada and elsewhere, are moving quickly to preserve climate data stored on government computer servers out of concern that the Trump administration might remove or dismantle the records. A “guerrilla archiving” event will be held at the University of Toronto this weekend to catalog U.S. government climate and environmental data. Other researchers from the University of California to the University of Pennsylvania are responding to calls on Twitter and the Internet to preserve data on everything from rising seas to wildfires. The actions come as President-elect Donald Trump has appointed climate change skeptics to all his top environment and energy posts. Though there has been no mention yet of removing publicly available data, “it’s not unreasonable to think that they would want to take down the very data that they dispute,” said Michael Halpern of the Union of Concerned Scientists.
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13 Dec 2016: Large Majority of U.S. Voters
Supports CO2 Limits and Renewable Energy

Seven in 10 American voters believe that the U.S. should participate in international efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new survey conducted by Yale University and George Mason University. The survey, which polled more than 1,200 people nationally shortly after the November election, also found that 62 percent and 63 percent of voters want President-elect Donald Trump and Congress to do more to address climate change, respectively. Only 10 percent of Americans oppose taxing or regulating greenhouse gas emissions, while 70 percent support limiting CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants — the primary aim of the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan — even if it raises the cost of electricity. Eighty-five percent of Democrats and 76 percent of Republicans think the U.S. should use more renewable energy, and more than 71 percent of polled voters believe the federal government should do more to prepare for the impacts of climate change.
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12 Dec 2016: Major Tech Investors Announce
$1 Billion Fund for Clean Energy Research

Bill Gates and several other major technology giants announced Sunday that they will invest $1 billion in clean energy innovation

Wind turbines near Fluvanna, Texas.
over the next several years. The investments will be made through the Breakthrough Energy Ventures fund, created by tech titans like Gates, co-founder of Microsoft, Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos, and Alibaba founder Jack Ma. Major areas of interest are expected to include energy storage, low-carbon electricity generation, transportation, and energy efficiency. "Anything that leads to cheap, clean, reliable energy we’re open-minded to," Gates told Quartz. “People think you can just put $50 million in and wait two years and then you know what you got. In this energy space, that’s not true at all.” The investments will help supplement federally funded research at government and university labs, as well as support early-stage startups and labs without government grants.
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From Obama’s Chief Scientist,
Parting Words of Caution on Climate

John Holdren is the longest-serving presidential science adviser in U.S. history and probably one of the most influential,
John Holdren

John Holdren
having advised President Obama on key energy issues for the last eight years. A physicist by training, Holdren was among the chief architects of the Obama administration’s Climate Action Plan. The plan has been lauded by environmentalists, but is loathed by conservative politicians, some of whom have filed suit against it. Holdren spoke with Yale e360 contributing writer Elizabeth Kolbert about the difference between “dangerous” and “catastrophic” warming, the incoming Trump administration, and how to talk to people who deny the existence of climate change. “Part of the reason that I retain some optimism about the future is that there are these fundamental forces pushing us toward doing the right thing,” he said.
Read the interview.
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06 Dec 2016: Google to Power Itself Using
100 Percent Renewable Energy in 2017

Google announced that it has purchased enough solar and wind capacity, 2.6 gigawatts, to run entirely on renewable energy next year.

The company, whose data centers and offices consume as much electricity as the city of San Francisco, will get most of its wind energy from the U.S. Midwest, the Netherlands, Norway, and Sweden, and its solar from contracts in North Carolina and Chile. Google bought its first wind power in 2010 and is now the world’s largest corporate buyer of renewable energy. “The science tells us that tackling climate change is an urgent global priority,” said Urs Hölzle, Google’s senior vice president of technical infrastructure. “We believe the private sector, in partnership with policy leaders, must take bold steps and that we can do so in a way that leads to growth and opportunity.”
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30 Nov 2016: Soils Could Release 55 Trillion
Kilograms of Carbon By Mid-Century

The world’s soils act as critical storage for carbon, sequestering carbon from the atmosphere to fuel plant and microbial activity.

Permafrost in Greenland.
But scientists warned this week that as soils warm in response to climate change, they could release 55 trillion kilograms of carbon by mid-century — roughly equivalent to the projected emissions of the United States, or 17 percent of all countries, during that same period. The largest losses will be from high-latitude ecosystems, the new study, led by scientists at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and published in the journal Nature, said. This includes Arctic and sub-Arctic permafrost, where colder temperatures and slow microbial activity have led to the buildup of massive carbon reserves over thousands of years. The scientists found that for every 1 degree Celsius of global warming, soils will release approximately 30 trillion kilograms of carbon into the atmosphere, or twice the annual emissions from human activities.
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23 Nov 2016: Trump Will Scrap NASA
Climate Research, Senior Adviser Says

NASA’s world-renowned research into climate change will be eliminated under a Donald J. Trump administration, with some of the space agency’s climate work being transferred to other parts of the U.S. government, according to Robert Walker, Trump’s senior adviser on NASA. Walker said NASA’s chief function will be space exploration and that there will be no need for it to conduct what he has called “politically correct environmental monitoring.” He added, “Mr. Trump’s decisions will be based upon solid science, not politicized science.” NASA, a global leader in monitoring climate change using satellites and other technologies, has a $2 billion earth sciences budget. Walker, a former Congressman, falsely claimed that only half of the world’s climate scientists believe that human activity is driving climate change. Trump said on Tuesday that he has an “open mind” about climate change and is re-evaluating his pledge to withdraw U.S. support for the Paris climate accords.
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21 Nov 2016: Canada to Phase Out
Nearly All Coal-Fired Electricity by 2030

Canada’s Environment Minister, Catherine McKenna, has announced that the country will eliminate virtually all coal-fired power plants by 2030, which would mean that 90 percent of Canada's electricity would come from carbon-free sources of energy by that time. Speaking to reporters in Ottawa, McKenna said that four provinces still burn coal for electricity — Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick. They will either phase out coal use or will be allowed to temporarily keep some coal-fired power plants open if equivalent CO2 emissions reductions are achieved in other sectors, McKenna said. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, whose Liberal Party took power a year ago, ran on a platform of reducing carbon emissions and embracing renewable energy. Roughly 60 percent of Canada’s electricity is generated using hydropower, and analysts predicted that the Liberal government’s announcement Monday will stimulate the development of wind, solar, and other renewable forms of energy.
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16 Nov 2016: Hundreds of U.S. Businesses Call
For Continued International Climate Action

More than 360 U.S.-based businesses, including some of the world’s largest multinational corporations, sent a letter to

Delegates at UN climate meetings in Morocco.
U.S. and world leaders this week asking them to continue to support the Paris climate agreement and speed up the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. "Failure to build a low-carbon economy puts American prosperity at risk,” the group said. “But the right action now will create jobs and boost U.S. competitiveness. We pledge to do our part, in our own operations and beyond.” The statement, presented at United Nations climate meetings in Marrakesh, Morocco this week, was addressed to U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, U.S. President Barack Obama, Congress, and world leaders. Signatories include major conglomerates such as General Mills, Hewlett-Packard, Hilton, Nike, Kellogg, Unilever, Starbucks, and DuPont, as well as more than 50 other companies and investors with annual revenues exceeding $100 million.
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11 Nov 2016: Just 1 Degree C of Warming Has
Altered Nearly Every Aspect of Life on Earth

Climate change has already impacted nearly every aspect of life on earth, according to a new study in the journal Science.

A bearded seal near Monaco Glacier, Svalbard.
Warming global temperatures have altered everything from entire ecosystems down to the individual genes of species. Some 80 percent of key ecological processes examined by the scientists show signs of change and distress. The disruptions could lead to unpredictable fisheries yields, reduced agricultural productivity, worsening pests and disease outbreaks, and “point toward an increasingly unpredictable future for humans,” the authors wrote. "There is now clear evidence that, with only a ~1 degree C of warming globally, very major impacts are already being felt," said lead author Brett Scheffers, an ecologist at the University of Florida. "Species' physiology and physical features such as body size are changing, species are rapidly moving to keep track of suitable climate space, and there are now signs of entire ecosystems under stress."
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Interview: At Standing Rock Protest,
A Battle Over Fossil Fuels and Land

For more than eight months, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota has been leading a protest to stop an oil pipeline from
Kyle Powys Whyte

Kyle Powys Whyte
potentially threatening its drinking water and sacred sites. In many ways, the battle over the Dakota Access Pipeline is a traditional fight over Native American land rights. But as indigenous rights expert Kyle Powys Whyte sees it, the demonstration also points to the important role tribes have played in opposing fossil fuel energy projects in recent years. “Almost everywhere you go, tribes have taken direct action to protect their health and their cultures and their economies from the threats, as well as the false promises of, extractive industries,” he says. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Powys Whyte talks about the long history of coal and oil and gas development on native lands and why Standing Rock has become a lightning rod for opposition to fossil fuels.
Read the interview.
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09 Nov 2016: Could Dying Puffins in the Bering
Sea Spell Trouble for Other Marine Life?

Starting in mid-October, hundreds of tufted puffins began washing up dead on islands in the Bering Sea off the coast of Alaska.

A tufted puffin on St. Paul Island in Alaska.
The birds weren’t sick, but were in an “advanced state of starvation,” National Geographic reported. While the deaths are alarming, scientists are also concerned about them being a harbinger of bad news for other marine species in the northern Pacific Ocean. Record-warm water temperatures in the region earlier this year may have shifted or reduced critical ocean food sources — small fish and zooplankton called copepods — affecting not only the puffins, but also dozens of other marine species, from seals to salmon to crab. “Clearly something very weird is going on,” said Julia Parrish, a biologist at the University of Washington. “It is basically every year now we’re getting some huge mass-mortality event… And the forage fish that everything depends on are taking it in the shorts.”
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04 Nov 2016: Scientists Attempt to
Create 3D Models of All Life on Earth

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst have launched a new initiative to create 3D models of all of the world’s living organisms.

A cane toad.
Biologist Duncan Irschick invented a 30-camera array, the “Beastcam,” that captures high-resolution, full-color images of an animal’s body from all different angles. Using those photographs, Irschick and his colleagues have already created 3D models of sharks, scorpions, toads, and lizards. They plan to focus next on capturing frogs and sea turtles. The initiative, known as Digital Life, is partnering with scientists, zoos, and non-profits to gain access to species, including those that are endangered or threatened, and providing 3D models at no cost via an open access website. “Digitally preserving the heritage of life on Earth is especially important given the rapid decline of many species,” said Irschick. “This technology can recreate organisms in a way that has never been done before.”
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26 Oct 2016: At Least 74,000 Americans Live
Near Oil and Gas Wells on Public Lands

A new online tool mapping active oil and gas wells on U.S. public lands shows that at least 74,000 people in six states

Map showing population and oil and gas wells.
live within a half-mile of drilling sites. That close proximity puts these people at increased risk of cancer, heart disease, and respiratory problems from natural gas leaking from the wells, said the Wilderness Society, which together with Earthworks helped create the tool. In Wyoming, for example, 15,869 oil and gas facilities operate on public land, and some 4,000 people live within a half-mile of them — the range that airborne pollutants from wells, such as benzene, can easily travel. The mapping tool is being released at a time when scientists, environmental groups, and policymakers are ramping up calls to reduce and regulate natural gas leaks from drilling and storage sites.
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24 Oct 2016: Pope Francis’ Call for Climate
Action Fails to Sway Many Americans

A direct call to action by the Pope has apparently failed to inspire people to be concerned about climate change, according to a new national survey by

Pope Francis.
public policy researchers at the University of Pennsylvania. Last year, Pope Francis release a 200-page papal letter entitled “Laudato Si,” or “Be Praised,” that urged 1.1 billion Catholics to address climate change and live more sustainably. The new survey, published in the journal Climatic Change, found those who had heard of the encyclical — both Catholics and non-Catholics — were no more concerned about global warming than those who hadn’t. Those who knew about the encyclical were also more politically polarized in their acceptance or denial of climate change. The scientists used data from 1,381 20-minute phone interviews one week before the encyclical’s release and two weeks after it was published.
PERMALINK

 

21 Oct 2016: Scientists Report Finding DNA
Mutations That Caused Snakes to Lose Legs

A mutation in the DNA of some reptiles about 150 million years ago switched off the gene responsible for forming limbs — leading to the

A green tree python.
creation of modern day snakes, according to two studies published week. The findings were discovered by two independent teams of researchers, which reported their results separately in the journals Current Biology and Cell. Some snakes, including pythons and boas, still have tiny leg bones inside their bodies, remnants of this evolutionary history; but most species lost their legs starting about100 million years ago. The scientists traced the mutation back to a docking site for proteins, known as an enhancer, situated in front of the Sonic hedgehog gene, which controls limb development. They found that the enhancer is simply switched off, not broken. When the missing DNA was fixed and the modified enhancer was put in mice, they grew legs like normal.
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19 Oct 2016: Can We Turn CO2 into a Useable
Fuel? Scientists Say They Have Found a Way

Scientists at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee report that they have found a way to convert carbon dioxide into ethanol, a usable fuel. The team used a spiky nanotechnology-based catalyst made out of carbon, copper, and nitrogen. When they applied voltage to the catalyst, CO2 dissolved in water turned into ethanol, with a yield of 63 percent. “We discovered somewhat by accident that this material works,” said Adam Rondinone, the Oak Ridge scientist that led the research. Because the materials are relatively cheap and the reaction can happen at room temperature, the researchers say the technique could be scaled up to store renewable energy as ethanol, for example, or to convert CO2 emissions into fuel. Finding new ways to use CO2 “in order to displace a fossil feedstock,” the scientists wrote in the study, “is an appropriate intermediate step towards a carbon-free future.”
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18 Oct 2016: September Breaks Monthly Temp
Record, Continuing World’s Warming Trend

September was the warmest September since modern record keeping began around 1880, measuring 0.91 degrees Celsius higher than the 1951-1980

Temperature anomalies in September 2016.
average, according to new data by NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. According to NASA, “11 of the past 12 consecutive months dating back to October 2015 have set new monthly high-temperature records.” Or as the website Climate Central put it, “September [is] an exclamation point on a string of hot months.” The new temperature data nearly guarantees that 2016 will be named the hottest year on record, measuring about 1.25 degrees Celsius above the late 19th century average, according to climate scientist Gavin Schmidt, the director of GISS. NASA’s temperature data is collected by 6,300 meteorological stations scattered across the globe, a buoy-based data system in the oceans, and research centers on Antarctica.
PERMALINK

 

14 Oct 2016: Is There Too Much Emphasis
Being Placed on Carbon Capture Technology?

The world is placing too much credence on being able to combat climate change by pulling carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, a process known as “air capture,” according to an article in the journal Science this week. “Negative-emission technologies are not an insurance policy, but rather an unjust and high-stakes gamble,” wrote the article’s authors, Kevin Anderson, a climate scientist at the University of Manchester in the U.K, and Glen Peters, a scientist at CICERO, a climate research organization in Norway. “There is a real risk they will be unable to deliver on the scale of their promise,” and assuming otherwise is “a moral hazard par excellence,” they wrote. Carbon capture technologies are a key component of the Paris climate agreement, with many of the modeling scenarios assuming the technology will be operating on a large scale later this century, reported Climate Central.
PERMALINK

 

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