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Archive: Water

10 Jul 2014

Loss of Snowpack and Glaciers In Rockies Poses Water Threat

by ED STRUZIK
From the Columbia River basin in the U.S. to the Prairie Provinces of Canada, scientists and policy makers are confronting a future in which the loss of snow and ice in the Rocky Mountains could imperil water supplies for agriculture, cities and towns, and hydropower production. READ MORE

24 Jun 2014

Life on the Mississippi: Tale of the Lost River Shrimp

by PAUL GREENBERG
The 20th-century re-engineering of the Mississippi River wreaked havoc on natural systems and devastated once-abundant populations of native river shrimp. Biologist Paul Hartfield has focused his work on studying these creatures, which were known for making one of the world’s great migrations. READ MORE

12 Jun 2014

Can Waterless Dyeing Processes Clean Up the Clothing Industry?

by LYDIA HEIDA
One of the world’s most polluting industries is the textile-dyeing sector, which in China and other Asian nations releases trillions of liters of chemically tainted wastewater. But new waterless dyeing technologies, if adopted on a large scale, could sharply cut pollution from the clothing industry. READ MORE

03 Jun 2014

New Desalination Technologies Spur Growth in Recyling Water

by CHERYL KATZ
Desalination has long been associated with one process — turning seawater into drinking water. But a host of new technologies are being developed that not only are improving traditional desalination but opening up new frontiers in reusing everything from agricultural water to industrial effluent. READ MORE

27 May 2014

As Dairy Farms Grow Bigger, New Concerns About Pollution

by ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
Dairy operations in the U.S. are consolidating, with ever-larger numbers of cows concentrated on single farms. In states like Wisconsin, opposition to some large operations is growing after manure spills and improper handling of waste have contaminated waterways and aquifers. READ MORE

06 May 2014

Mimicking Nature, New Designs Ease Fish Passage Around Dams

by REBECCA KESSLER
Originating in Europe, "nature-like" fishways are now being constructed on some U.S. rivers where removing dams is not an option. Unlike traditional fish ladders, these passages use a natural approach aimed at significantly increasing once-abundant runs of migratory fish. READ MORE

24 Apr 2014

Mining Showdown in Andes Over Unique Páramo Lands

by CHRIS KRAUL
High-altitude neotropical ecosystems known as páramos are increasingly at risk in Colombia and elsewhere in South America as major mining companies seek to exploit rich deposits of gold and other minerals. Such projects, scientists warn, could have serious impacts on critical water supplies. READ MORE

03 Apr 2014

New Satellite Boosts Research On Global Rainfall and Climate

by NICOLA JONES
Although it may seem simple, measuring rainfall worldwide has proven to be a difficult job for scientists. But a recently launched satellite is set to change that, providing data that could help in understanding whether global rainfall really is increasing as the planet warms. READ MORE

31 Mar 2014

Scientists Focus on Polar Waters As Threat of Acidification Grows

by JO CHANDLER
A sophisticated and challenging experiment in Antarctica is the latest effort to study ocean acidification in the polar regions, where frigid waters are expected to feel most acutely the ecological impacts of acidic conditions not seen in millions of years. READ MORE

27 Mar 2014

On Ravaged Tar Sands Lands, Big Challenges for Reclamation

by ED STRUZIK
The mining of Canada’s tar sands has destroyed large areas of sensitive wetlands in Alberta. Oil sands companies have vowed to reclaim this land, but little restoration has occurred so far and many scientists say it is virtually impossible to rebuild these complex ecosystems. READ MORE

24 Mar 2014

UN Climate Report Is Cautious On Making Specific Predictions

by FRED PEARCE
The draft of the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns that the world faces serious risks from warming and that the poor are especially vulnerable. But it avoids the kinds of specific forecasts that have sparked controversy in the past. READ MORE

20 Feb 2014

Life on Mekong Faces Threats As Major Dams Begin to Rise

by JOSHUA ZAFFOS
With a massive dam under construction in Laos and other dams on the way, the Mekong River is facing a wave of hydroelectric projects that could profoundly alter the river’s ecology and disrupt the food supplies of millions of people in Southeast Asia. READ MORE

18 Feb 2014

As Fracking Booms, Growing Concerns About Wastewater

by ROGER REAL DROUIN
With hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas continuing to proliferate across the U.S., scientists and environmental activists are raising questions about whether millions of gallons of contaminated drilling fluids could be threatening water supplies and human health. READ MORE

10 Feb 2014

In Flood-Prone New Orleans, an Architect Makes Water His Ally

As these photographs and illustrations show, architect David Waggonner has decided that the best way to protect low-lying New Orleans is to think about water in an entirely different way. READ MORE

10 Dec 2013

A Successful Push to Restore Europe’s Long-Abused Rivers

by FRED PEARCE
From Britain to the Czech Republic, European nations have been restoring rivers to their natural state — taking down dams, removing levees, and reviving floodplains. For a continent that long viewed rivers as little more than shipping canals and sewers, it is a striking change. READ MORE

14 Nov 2013

China at Crossroads: Balancing The Economy and Environment

by R. EDWARD GRUMBINE
After three decades of unbridled economic growth and mounting ecological problems, China and its new leadership face a key challenge: cleaning up the dirty air, polluted water, and tainted food supplies that are fueling widespread discontent among the country’s burgeoning middle class. READ MORE

12 Nov 2013

Canada’s Great Inland Delta: A Precarious Future Looms

by ED STRUZIK
The Peace-Athabasca Delta, one of the world’s largest freshwater deltas, is facing major change as rising temperatures, a prolonged drought, and water withdrawals for Alberta’s tar sands industry threaten to increasingly dry out this vast expanse of waterways and wetlands. READ MORE

04 Nov 2013

China’s Great Dam Boom: A Major Assault on Its Rivers

by CHARLTON LEWIS
China is engaged in a push to build hydroelectric dams on a scale unprecedented in human history. While being touted for producing lower-emission electricity, these massive dam projects are wreaking havoc on river systems across China and Southeast Asia. READ MORE

29 Oct 2013

A Key Mangrove Forest Faces Major Threat from a Coal Plant

by JEREMY HANCE
As Bangladesh makes a controversial turn to coal to produce electricity, the construction of a large coal-fired power plant is threatening the fragile ecosystem of the Sundarbans, the world’s largest mangrove forest. READ MORE

17 Oct 2013

Focusing a Lens on China's Environmental Challenges

by SEAN GALLAGHER
Traveling throughout China, from the Tibetan Plateau to the lush subtropical forests in the south, a photojournalist documents the vast scope of the country's environmental challenges. READ MORE

14 Oct 2013

The Ambitious Restoration of An Undammed Western River

by CAROLINE FRASER
With the dismantling of two dams on Washington state’s Elwha River, the world’s largest dam removal project is almost complete. Now, in one of the most extensive U.S. ecological restorations ever attempted, efforts are underway to revive one of the Pacific Northwest’s great salmon rivers. READ MORE

05 Sep 2013

How High Tech is Helping Bring Clean Water to India

by TODD WOODY
Anand Shah runs a company that is using solar-powered “water ATMs” to bring clean water to remote villages in India. In an e360 interview, Shah talks about how his company is using a high-tech approach to address one of India’s most intractable public health issues. READ MORE

11 Jul 2013

In Mekong Delta, Rice Boom Has Steep Environmental Cost

by MIKE IVES
Vietnam has become one of the world’s leading rice producers, thanks to the construction of an elaborate network of dikes and irrigation canals. But these extensive infrastructure projects in the storied Mekong Delta have come at a high ecological price. READ MORE

20 Jun 2013

Megadrought in U.S. Southwest: A Bad Omen for Forests Globally

by CAROLINE FRASER
Scientists studying a prolonged and severe drought in the southwestern U.S. say that extensive damage done to trees in that region portends what lies in store as other forests worldwide face rising temperatures, diminished rainfall, and devastating fires. READ MORE

30 May 2013

Will Huge New Hydro Projects Bring Power to Africa’s People?

by FRED PEARCE
A giant new hydro project on the Congo River is only the latest in a rush of massive dams being built across Africa. Critics contend small-scale renewable energy projects would be a far more effective way of bringing power to the hundreds of millions of Africans still without electricity. READ MORE

26 Dec 2012

What’s Damaging Marshes on U.S. Coast and Why It Matters

by KEVIN DENNEHY
A nine-year study led by researcher Linda Deegan points to the damage that human-caused nutrients inflict on salt marshes along the U.S. East Coast. In a Yale Environment 360 interview, she describes what these findings mean for an ecosystem that provides critical services, from nourishing marine life to buffering the coast from storms like Sandy. READ MORE

19 Nov 2012

A Global Treaty on Rivers: Key to True Water Security

by FRED PEARCE
No broad-based international agreement on sharing rivers currently exists, even though much of the world depends on water from rivers that flow through more than one nation. But that may be about to change, as two separate global river treaties are close to being approved. READ MORE

13 Sep 2012

Beyond Big Dams: Turning to Grass Roots Solutions on Water

by FRED PEARCE
Mega-dams and massive government-run irrigation projects are not the key to meeting world’s water needs, a growing number of experts now say. For developing nations, the answer may lie in small-scale measures such as inexpensive water pumps and other readily available equipment. READ MORE

26 Jul 2012

Melting Glaciers May Worsen Northwest China’s Water Woes

by MIKE IVES
In China’s sprawling Xinjiang region, where the population is growing and cotton farming is booming, a key river has been running dry in summer. Now a team of international scientists is grappling with a problem facing the Tarim River basin and other mountainous regions — how to secure water supplies as demands increase and glaciers melt. READ MORE

12 Jul 2012

The Dead Sea is Dying: Can A Controversial Plan Save It?

by DAVE LEVITAN
The Dead Sea — the lowest terrestrial point on the planet — is dropping at an alarming rate, falling more than 1 meter a year. A $10 billion proposal to pipe water from the Red Sea is being opposed by conservationists, who point to alternatives that could help save one of the world’s great natural places. READ MORE

07 Jun 2012

On Safe Drinking Water, Skepticism Over UN Claims

by FRED PEARCE
With great fanfare, the United Nations announced in March that the world had reduced by half the proportion of people drinking unsafe water, meeting a critical development goal five years ahead of schedule. But a closer look reveals that the facts simply do not support this claim. READ MORE

21 May 2012

The Clean Water Act at 40: There’s Still Much Left to Do

by PAUL GREENBERG
The Clean Water Act of 1972, one of the boldest environmental laws ever enacted, turns 40 this year, with an impressive record of cleaning up America's waterways. But from New York Harbor to Alaska’s Bristol Bay, key challenges remain. READ MORE

25 Apr 2012

A Kenyan Woman Stands Up Against Massive Dam Project

by CHRISTINA M. RUSSO
Ikal Angelei is helping lead a campaign to stop construction of a major dam in Ethiopia that threatens the water supply and way of life of tens of thousands of indigenous people. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, she explains what she believes is at stake in the fight against the Gibe III dam. READ MORE

22 Sep 2011

Colorado River: Running Near Empty

Photographer Pete McBride traveled along the Colorado River from its source high in the Rockies to its historic mouth at the Sea of Cortez. In a Yale Environment 360 video, he documents how increasing water demands have transformed the river that is the lifeblood for an arid Southwest. READ MORE

21 Jul 2011

On Lake Taihu, China Moves To Battle Massive Algae Blooms

by RICHARD STONE
For two decades, the once-scenic Lake Taihu in eastern China has been choked with devastating algae blooms that have threatened drinking water for millions. Now, in a move that could provide lessons for other huge lakes worldwide, China is taking steps to restore Taihu’s ecological balance. READ MORE

03 Feb 2011

Africa’s Flourishing Niger Delta Threatened by Libya Water Plan

by FRED PEARCE
The inland Niger delta of Mali is a unique wetland ecosystem that supports a million farmers, fishermen, and herders and a rich diversity of wildlife. But now, the country’s president and Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi have begun a major agricultural project that will divert much of the river’s water and put the delta’s future at risk. READ MORE

20 Dec 2010

In China, a New Transparency On Government Pollution Data

by CHRISTINA LARSON
The Chinese government has begun to make environmental records available to the public, empowering green groups and citizens as they try to force factories — and the Western companies they supply — to comply with the law. READ MORE

26 Oct 2010

When The Water Ends: Africa’s Climate Conflicts

As temperatures rise and water supplies dry up, semi-nomadic tribes along the Kenyan-Ethiopian border increasingly are coming into conflict with each other. A Yale Environment 360 video report from East Africa focuses on a phenomenon that climate scientists say will be more and more common in the 21st century: how worsening drought will pit groups — and nations — against one another READ MORE

23 Aug 2010

On China’s Beleaguered Yangtze, A Push to Save Surviving Species

by RICHARD STONE
The Yangtze has been carved up by dams, used as an open sewer, and subjected to decades of overfishing. Now, Chinese scientists — alarmed by the disappearance of the Yangtze river dolphin and other creatures — are calling for a 10-year moratorium on fishing in the world’s third-longest river. READ MORE

26 Jul 2010

Growing Shortages of Water Threaten China’s Development

by CHRISTINA LARSON
With 20 percent of the world’s population but just 7 percent of its available freshwater, China faces serious water shortages as its economy booms and urbanization increases. The government is planning massive water diversion projects, but environmentalists say conservation — especially in the wasteful agricultural sector — is the key. READ MORE

19 Jul 2010

Does Egypt Own The Nile? A Battle Over Precious Water

by FRED PEARCE
A dispute between Egypt and upstream African nations has brought to the fore a long-standing controversy over who has rights to the waters of the Nile. The outcome could have profound consequences for the ecological health of the river and for one of the world’s largest tropical wetlands. READ MORE

14 Oct 2009

Leveling Appalachia: The Legacy of Mountaintop Removal Mining

During the last two decades, mountaintop removal mining in Appalachia has destroyed or severely damaged more than a million acres of forest and buried nearly 2,000 miles of streams. Leveling Appalachia: The Legacy of Mountaintop Removal Mining, a video report produced by Yale Environment 360 in collaboration with MediaStorm, focuses on the environmental and social impacts of this practice and examines the long-term effects on the region’s forests and waterways.
READ MORE

21 Sep 2009

Korea’s Four Rivers Project: Economic Boost or Boondoggle?

by JAMES CARD
The natural landscape of South Korea has been largely re-engineered, with nearly every river damned or forced into concrete channels. Now the government is reviving plans for a mammoth water project that would dredge and develop hundreds more miles of waterways and put added stress on the country's remaining wildlife. READ MORE

16 Jun 2009

The Damming of the Mekong: Major Blow to an Epic River

by FRED PEARCE
The Mekong has long flowed freely, supporting one of the world’s great inland fisheries. But China is now building a series of dams on the 2,800-mile river that will restrict its natural flow and threaten the sustenance of tens of millions of Southeast Asians. READ MORE

02 Apr 2009

Warming Takes Center Stage as Australian Drought Worsens

by KEITH SCHNEIDER
With record-setting heat waves, bush fires and drought, Australians are increasingly convinced they are facing the early impacts of global warming. Their growing concern about climate change has led to a consensus that the nation must now act boldly to stave off the crisis. READ MORE

08 Jan 2009

On Chinese Water Project, A Struggle Over Sound Science

by CHRISTINA LARSON
Geologist Yong Yang has serious concerns about plans for a massive Yangtze River diversion project. When he went public with them, he found out how difficult it can be to challenge a government decision in China. The third in a series on Chinese environmentalists. READ MORE

18 Sep 2008

Will the Jordan River Keep on Flowing?

by GIDON BROMBERG
Massive withdrawals for irrigation, rapid population growth, and a paralyzing regional conflict have drained nearly all the water from this fabled river. A leading Israeli conservationist describes a multinational effort to save the Jordan River. READ MORE

08 Sep 2008

Alaska’s Pebble Mine: Fish Versus Gold

by BILL SHERWONIT
With the support of Gov. Sarah Palin, mining interests have defeated an Alaska ballot measure that could have blocked a huge proposed mining project. Now, plans are moving forward to exploit the massive gold and copper deposit at Bristol Bay, home of one of the world’s greatest salmon runs. READ MORE

21 Jul 2008

China’s New Environmental Advocates

by CHRISTINA LARSON
Until recently, the idea of environmental advocacy was largely unheard of in China. But that’s changing rapidly. At a legal aid center based in Beijing, Xu Kezhu and her colleagues are helping pollution victims stand up for their rights. The second in a series on Chinese environmentalists. READ MORE

03 Jun 2008

Water Scarcity: The Real Food Crisis

by FRED PEARCE
In the discussion of the global food emergency, one underlying factor is barely mentioned: The world is running out of water. A British science writer, who authored a major book on water resources, here explores the nexus between water overconsumption and current food shortages. READ MORE

03 Jun 2008

China’s Emerging Environmental Movement

by CHRISTINA LARSON
Quietly and somewhat surprisingly, green groups are cropping up throughout China and are starting to have an impact. In the first in a series on Chinese environmentalists, journalist Christina Larson visits with Zhao Zhong, who is leading the fight to save the Yellow River. READ MORE

03 Jun 2008

Russia’s Lake Baikal: Preserving a Natural Treasure

by PETER THOMSON
The world's greatest lake, holding 20 percent of the planet's surface fresh water, has long remained one of the most pristine places on earth. Now, as Russia's economy booms and its climate warms, the Siberian lake faces new threats. READ MORE

e360 digest

25 Jul 2014: Southwestern U.S. Aquifers Are Extremely Low, NASA Data Show

15 Jul 2014: California Agriculture Relying Too Heavily on Groundwater in Drought

14 Jul 2014: Human Activity Has Caused Long-term Australian Drought, Model Shows

12 Jun 2014: U.S. Breweries Cut Water Use Amid Widespread Drought Conditions

11 Jun 2014: Group Will Pay Farmers To Create Temporary Migratory Bird Habitat

21 May 2014: Trash-scooping Water Wheel Cleans up Garbage From Baltimore Harbor

13 May 2014: Half of U.S. is Experiencing Some Degree of Drought, Analysis Finds

02 May 2014: Fracking May Induce Quakes at Greater Distance than Previously Thought

22 Apr 2014: Run-of-River Hydropower Set For Big Gains, Turbine Maker Predicts

18 Apr 2014: Scale and Extent of Dam Boom In China Is Detailed in Mapping Project


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