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Archive: Forests

02 Sep 2014

Badru’s Story: Early Warnings From Inside an Impenetrable African Forest

"Badru’s Story," which documents the work of researchers in Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, is the first-place winner of the Yale Environment 360 Video Contest. Filmmakers Benjamin Drummond and Sara Joy Steele trek along with scientist Badru Mugerwa and his team as they monitor the impact of climate change on one of Africa’s most diverse forests and its extraordinary wildlife. READ MORE

28 Aug 2014

Fate of the Passenger Pigeon Looms as a Somber Warning

by JOEL GREENBERG
This September 1 marks the 100th anniversary of the death of Martha, the last known passenger pigeon on earth. The extinction of this once-abundant North American bird still stands as a cautionary tale. READ MORE

20 Aug 2014

How Drones Are Emerging As Valuable Conservation Tool

by CRYSTAL GAMMON
Lian Pin Koh believes drones can be a key part of conservation efforts, particularly in remote regions. In a Yale Environment 360 interview, he talks about how his project, ConservationDrones, is promoting the use of drones for everything from counting orangutans to stopping poaching. READ MORE

01 May 2014

In a Troubled African Park, A Battle Over Oil Exploration

by FRED PEARCE
Congo's Virunga National Park has long been known for its mountain gorillas and for the lawless militias that operate there. But the recent shooting of the park warden and plans to begin oil exploration in the park have sparked concern about the future of this iconic World Heritage Site. READ MORE

10 Apr 2014

Will Increased Food Production Devour Tropical Forest Lands?

by WILLIAM LAURANCE
As global population soars, efforts to boost food production will inevitably be focused on the world’s tropical regions. Can this agricultural transformation be achieved without destroying the remaining tropical forests of Africa, South America, and Asia? READ MORE

27 Mar 2014

On Ravaged Tar Sands Lands, Big Challenges for Reclamation

by ED STRUZIK
The mining of Canada’s tar sands has destroyed large areas of sensitive wetlands in Alberta. Oil sands companies have vowed to reclaim this land, but little restoration has occurred so far and many scientists say it is virtually impossible to rebuild these complex ecosystems. READ MORE

17 Mar 2014

Rebuilding the Natural World: A Shift in Ecological Restoration

by RICHARD CONNIFF
From forests in Queens to wetlands in China, planners and scientists are promoting a new approach that incorporates experiments into landscape restoration projects to determine what works to the long-term benefit of nature and what does not. READ MORE

13 Mar 2014

In the Pastures of Colombia, Cows, Crops and Timber Coexist

by LISA PALMER
As an ambitious program in Colombia demonstrates, combining grazing and agriculture with tree cultivation can coax more food from each acre, boost farmers’ incomes, restore degraded landscapes, and make farmland more resilient to climate change. READ MORE

10 Mar 2014

A New Leaf in the Rainforest: Longtime Villain Vows Reform

by RHETT BUTLER
Few companies have done as much damage to the world’s tropical forests as Asia Pulp & Paper. But under intense pressure from its customers and conservation groups, APP has embarked on a series of changes that could significantly reduce deforestation in Indonesia and serve as a model for forestry reform. READ MORE

06 Mar 2014

Wendell Berry: A Strong Voice For Local Farming and the Land

by ROGER COHN
For six decades, writer Wendell Berry has spoken out in defense of local agriculture, rural communities, and the importance of caring for the land. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, he talks about his Kentucky farm, his activism, and why he remains hopeful for the future. READ MORE

27 Jan 2014

Monitoring Corporate Behavior: Greening or Merely Greenwash?

by FRED PEARCE
Companies with bad environmental records are increasingly turning to a little-known nonprofit called TFT to make sure they meet commitments to improve their practices. It remains to be seen if this is just a PR move or a turning point for corporate conduct. READ MORE

19 Dec 2013

In Imperiled Forests of Borneo, A Rich Tropical Eden Endures

by WILLIAM LAURANCE
In Borneo's Danum Valley — one of the last, untouched forest reserves in a region ravaged by logging and oil palm cultivation — a team of international and Malaysian scientists is fighting to preserve an area of stunning biodiversity. READ MORE

07 Nov 2013

People or Parks: The Human Factor in Protecting Wildlife

by RICHARD CONNIFF
Recent studies in Asia and Australia found that community-managed areas can sometimes do better than traditional parks at preserving habitat and biodiversity. When it comes to conservation, maybe local people are not the problem, but the solution. READ MORE

29 Oct 2013

A Key Mangrove Forest Faces Major Threat from a Coal Plant

by JEREMY HANCE
As Bangladesh makes a controversial turn to coal to produce electricity, the construction of a large coal-fired power plant is threatening the fragile ecosystem of the Sundarbans, the world’s largest mangrove forest. READ MORE

07 Oct 2013

Microbiomes at the Roots: A New Look at Forest Ecology

by RICHARD CONNIFF
With advances in genetic sequencing technology, scientists are now able to readily identify the microbes living in and around the roots of trees. This information is proving to have important implications for everything from tropical forest restoration to climate change planning. READ MORE

26 Aug 2013

On a Remote Island, Lessons In How Ecosystems Function

by FRED PEARCE
Transformed by British sailors in the 19th century, Ascension Island in the South Atlantic has a unique tropical forest consisting almost entirely of alien species. Scientists say that what has happened there challenges some basic assumptions about ecosystems and evolution. READ MORE

12 Aug 2013

The War on African Poaching: Is Militarization Doomed to Fail?

by ADAM WELZ
African countries and private game reserves are engaging in an increasingly sophisticated arms race against poachers, yet the slaughter of elephants and rhinos continues. Some experts argue that the battle must be joined on a far wider front that targets demand in Asia and judicial dysfunction in Africa. READ MORE

01 Aug 2013

The Rise of Rubber Takes Toll On Forests of Southwest China

by MIKE IVES
In one of China’s most biodiverse regions, the spread of rubber plantations to supply the country’s burgeoning automobile industry is carving up habitat and harming watersheds and tropical forest ecosystems. READ MORE

18 Jul 2013

Should Wolves Stay Protected Under Endangered Species Act?

by TED WILLIAMS
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has stirred controversy with its proposal to remove endangered species protection for wolves, noting the animals’ strong comeback in the northern Rockies and the Midwest. It’s the latest in the long, contentious saga of wolf recovery in the U.S. READ MORE

13 Jun 2013

The Surprising Role of CO2 in Changes on the African Savanna

by ADAM WELZ
Recent studies show that many of the world’s savannas, including famed southern African landscapes, are experiencing significant change as rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere favor the growth of trees over grasslands. READ MORE

01 May 2013

Ginkgo: The Life Story of The Oldest Tree on Earth

by ROGER COHN
Revered for its beauty and its longevity, the ginkgo is a living fossil, unchanged for more than 200 million years. Botanist Peter Crane, who has a written what he calls a biography of this unique tree, talks to Yale Environment 360 about the inspiring history and cultural significance of the ginkgo. READ MORE

25 Apr 2013

Fires Burn More Fiercely As Northern Forests Warm

by DYLAN WALSH
From North America to Siberia, rising temperatures and drier woodlands are leading to a longer burning season and a significant increase in forest fires. Scientists warn that this trend is expected continue in the years ahead. READ MORE

21 Mar 2013

Giant Sequoias Face Looming Threat from Shifting Climate

by BRUCE DORMINEY
The world’s largest living species, native to California’s Sierra Nevada, faces a two-pronged risk from declining snowpack and rising temperatures. The threat to sequoias mirrors a growing danger to trees worldwide, with some scientists saying rapid warming this century could wipe out many of the planet’s old trees. READ MORE

14 Mar 2013

Into the Heart of Ecuador’s Yasuni

Few places on earth harbor as much biodiversity as Ecuador’s Yasuni Biosphere Reserve, which sits atop vast deposits of oil and now faces intense development pressure. In a Yale Environment 360 video, filmmaker Ryan Killackey travels to the heart of Yasuni with scientists inventorying its stunning wildlife and plants. The researchers hope their work will bolster initiatives to preserve this threatened land. READ MORE

07 Mar 2013

Biodiversity in Logged Forests Far Higher Than Once Believed

by FRED PEARCE
New research shows that scientists have significantly overestimated the damage that logging in tropical forests has done to biodiversity, a finding that could change the way conservationists think about how best to preserve species in areas disturbed by humans. READ MORE

15 Nov 2012

As Myanmar Opens to World, Fate of Its Forests Is on the Line

by CHARLES SCHMIDT
Years of sanctions against Myanmar’s military regime helped protect its extensive wild lands. But as the country’s rulers relax their grip and welcome foreign investment, can the nation protect its forests and biodiversity while embracing development? READ MORE

25 Oct 2012

For Wolves on the Brink, A Hobbled Recovery Plan

by CAROLINE FRASER
Few creatures in the United States have come as close to extinction as the Mexican wolf, which was wiped out in the U.S. by 1970. Now, scientists and conservationists contend, federal officials are caving into political pressure and failing to implement a legally mandated reintroduction plan. READ MORE

08 Oct 2012

In the Land of the Maya, A Battle for a Vital Forest

by WILLIAM ALLEN
In Guatemala’s vast Maya Biosphere Reserve, conservation groups are battling to preserve a unique rainforest now under threat from Mexican drug cartels, Salvadoran drug gangs, and Chinese-backed groups illegally logging prime tropical hardwoods. READ MORE

20 Aug 2012

Gauging the Impact of Warming On Asia’s Life-Giving Monsoons

by CHRISTINA LARSON
In Mongolia, U.S. scientists are studying climate clues in ancient tree rings to help answer a crucial question: How will global warming affect Asia’s monsoon rains, which supply water for agriculture and drinking to half the world’s population? READ MORE

16 Aug 2012

In Ghana’s Forests, Should Chainsaw Loggers be Legalized?

by FRED PEARCE
The West African nation of Ghana prohibits small operators using chainsaws from logging its forests, but it permits the export of timber cut at large sawmills. Now, some analysts are questioning whether such laws simply benefit powerful business interests without helping local communities or the forest. READ MORE

02 Aug 2012

Dreaming of a Place Where the Buffalo Roam

by HILLARY ROSNER
Former Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sean Gerrity is trying to turn a swath of northeastern Montana into a prairie reserve teeming with herds of bison. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Gerrity talks about the challenges of reclaiming a landscape long dominated by agriculture. READ MORE

02 Jul 2012

Oh Canada: The Government’s Broad Assault on Environment

by ED STRUZIK
Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government has been weakening Canada’s environmental regulations and slashing funds for oversight and research — all while promoting aggressive resource development. Critics warn these unprecedented actions pose a major threat to the nation’s vast natural heritage. READ MORE

19 Jun 2012

Looking for Solutions in the Fight to Preserve Biodiversity

by ROGER COHN
At the Rio+20 conference this week, conservation biologist Thomas Lovejoy received the prestigious Blue Planet Prize. Before traveling to Brazil, Lovejoy talked with Yale Environment 360 about the loss of biodiversity and about whether it is too late for the world to do something about it. READ MORE

12 Jun 2012

A Desperate Effort to Save the Rainforest of Borneo

by RHETT BUTLER
The once-magnificent tropical forests of Borneo have been decimated by rampant logging and clearing for oil palm plantations. But in the Malaysian state of Sabah, a top official is fighting to reverse that trend by bringing sustainable forestry to the beleaguered island. READ MORE

23 May 2012

Global Scarcity: Scramble for Dwindling Natural Resources

by DIANE TOOMEY
National security expert Michael Klare believes the struggle for the world’s resources will be one of the defining political and environmental realities of the 21st century. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, he discusses the threat this scramble poses to the natural world and what can be done to sustainably meet the resource challenge. READ MORE

26 Apr 2012

Fighting A Last-Ditch Battle To Save the Rare Javan Rhino

by RHETT BUTLER
Rhinoceroses worldwide are under siege as their habitat shrinks and poachers slaughter hundreds annually for their valuable horns. Now, in Indonesia, conservation groups are engaged in a desperate struggle to save the last 40 Javan rhinos on earth. READ MORE

15 Mar 2012

Digital Defenders: Tribal People Use GPS to Protect Their Lands

by FRED PEARCE
From the rainforests of central Africa to the Australian outback, indigenous people armed with GPS devices are surveying their territories and producing maps they can use to protect them from logging and other outside development. READ MORE

16 Feb 2012

Busting the Forest Myths: People as Part of the Solution

by FRED PEARCE
The long-held contention that rural forest communities are the prime culprits in tropical forest destruction is increasingly being discredited, as evidence mounts that the best way to protect rainforests is to involve local residents in sustainable management. READ MORE

23 Jan 2012

Monitoring A Grim Rise In the Illegal Ivory Trade

by CHRISTINA M. RUSSO
For two decades, TRAFFIC’s Tom Milliken has tracked the illicit ivory trade that has led to the continued slaughter of Africa’s elephants. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Milliken talks about the recent increase in ivory seizures and the criminal gangs that supply Asia’s black market for ivory. READ MORE

19 Jan 2012

As Roads Spread in Rainforests, The Environmental Toll Grows

by WILLIAM LAURANCE
From Brazil to Borneo, new roads are being built into tropical forests at a dizzying pace, putting previously intact wilderness at risk. If we hope to preserve rainforests, a leading researcher says, new strategies must be adopted to limit the number of roads and reduce their impacts. READ MORE

17 Jan 2012

China’s Reforestation Programs: Big Success or Just an Illusion?

by JON R. LUOMA
China has undertaken ambitious reforestation initiatives that have increased its forest cover dramatically in the last decade. But scientists are now raising questions about just how effective these grand projects will turn out to be. READ MORE

01 Dec 2011

Sweden’s Green Veneer Hides Unsustainable Logging Practices

by ERIK HOFFNER
Sweden has a reputation as being one of the world’s most environmentally progressive nations. But its surprisingly lax forestry laws often leave decisions about logging to the timber companies — and as a result, large swaths of biologically-rich boreal forest are being lost. READ MORE

17 Nov 2011

China’s Appetite for Wood Takes a Heavy Toll on Forests

by WILLIAM LAURANCE
More than half of the timber now shipped globally is destined for China. But unscrupulous Chinese companies are importing huge amounts of illegally harvested wood, prompting conservation groups to step up boycotts against rapacious timber interests. READ MORE

10 Nov 2011

Military Bases Provide Unlikely Refuge For South’s Longleaf Pine

by BRUCE DORMINEY
The expanses of longleaf pine forest that once covered the southeastern United States have been whittled away to just 3 percent of their original range. But as scientists are discovering, this threatened forest ecosystem has found a sanctuary in an unexpected place — U.S. military installations. READ MORE

27 Oct 2011

Killing Wolves: A Product of Alberta’s Big Oil and Gas Boom

by ED STRUZIK
The development of the tar sands and other oil and gas fields in Alberta has carved up the Canadian province's boreal forest, threatening herds of woodland caribou. But rather than protect caribou habitat, officials have taken a controversial step: the large-scale killing of the wolves that prey on the caribou. READ MORE

10 Oct 2011

Can Wildlife Corridors Heal Fragmented Landscapes?

by JIM ROBBINS
Conservationists have long called for creating ecological corridors that would enable large mammals and other wildlife to roam more freely across an increasingly developed planet. But now scientists are taking a closer look at just how well these corridors are working and what role they might play in a warming world. READ MORE

03 Oct 2011

A Revolutionary Technology is Unlocking Secrets of the Forest

by RHETT BUTLER
A new imaging system that uses a suite of airborne sensors is capable of providing detailed, three-dimensional pictures of tropical forests — including the species they contain and the amount of CO2 they store — at astonishing speed. These advances could play a key role in preserving the world’s beleaguered rainforests. READ MORE

26 Sep 2011

The Big Payback from Bringing Back Peat Bogs

by FRED PEARCE
The draining and burning of peat bogs is a major global source of CO2 emissions. Now, a pilot project in Russia — where wildfires burned vast areas of dried-out bogs last summer — is looking to re-flood and restore tens of thousands of acres to their natural state. READ MORE

15 Sep 2011

The Crucial Role of Predators: A New Perspective on Ecology

by CAROLINE FRASER
Scientists have recently begun to understand the vital role played by top predators in ecosystems and the profound impacts that occur when those predators are wiped out. Now, researchers are citing new evidence that shows the importance of lions, wolves, sharks, and other creatures at the top of the food chain. READ MORE

12 Sep 2011

A Huge Oil Palm Plantation Puts African Rainforest at Risk

by RHETT BUTLER AND JEREMY HANCE
As global agricultural companies turn to Africa, a U.S. firm is planning a massive oil palm plantation in Cameroon that it says will benefit local villagers. But critics argue that the project would destroy some of the key remaining forests in the West African nation and threaten species-rich reserves. READ MORE

08 Sep 2011

Saving Ancient Walnut Forests In the Valleys of Central Asia

by MIKE IVES
The former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan is home to some of the world’s largest remaining forests of walnut and wild fruit trees. In an effort to sustainably manage this global resource, an international project has focused on ending Soviet-style management and giving power — and a profit incentive — to local farmers. READ MORE

11 Jul 2011

Tapping Social Media’s Potential To Muster a Vast Green Army

by CAROLINE FRASER
A rapidly expanding universe of citizens’ groups, researchers, and environmental organizations are making use of social media and smart phone applications to document changes in the natural world and to mobilize support for taking action. READ MORE

14 Jun 2011

In Brazil, Palm Oil Plantations Could Help Preserve the Amazon

by RHETT BUTLER
In recent years, palm oil development in Malaysia and Indonesia has devastated tropical forests there. With Brazil on the verge of its own palm oil boom, can sustainable cultivation of the crop actually help save the rainforest, rather than hastening its destruction? READ MORE

02 May 2011

The World’s Tropical Forests Are Already Feeling the Heat

by WILLIAM LAURANCE
Much attention has been paid to how global warming is affecting the world’s polar regions and glaciers. But a leading authority on tropical forests warns that rising temperatures could have an equally profound impact on rainforests and are already taking a toll on some tropical species. READ MORE

05 Apr 2011

A Scientist Extols the Value Of Forests Shaped by Humans

by JOHN CAREY
Political ecologist Susanna Hecht has incurred the wrath of some conservationists by arguing that the notion of the primeval forest is largely a myth and that disturbed forests play a vital ecological function. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, she makes the case for a “new rurality” that places less emphasis on protected forests and more on the areas where people live. READ MORE

31 Mar 2011

As Larger Animals Decline, Forests Feel Their Absence

by SHARON LEVY
With giant tortoises, elephants, and other fruit-eating animals disappearing from many of the world’s tropical woodlands, forests are suffering from the loss of a key function performed by these creatures: the dispersal of tree seeds. But a new experiment shows that introduced species may be able to fulfill this vital ecological role. READ MORE

19 Jan 2011

A Fierce Advocate for Grizzlies Sees Warning Signs for the Bear

Doug Peacock has been tireless defender of the Yellowstone grizzly for decades, but he believes the bear may now be facing its toughest threat yet. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, Peacock talks about the insect infestation that is destroying a key food source for grizzlies and recalls some of his closest encounters with the bears. READ MORE

27 Dec 2010

Indonesia’s Corruption Legacy Clouds a Forest Protection Plan

by RHETT BUTLER
Norway and other nations have vowed to invest billions of dollars to help preserve Indonesia’s remaining tropical forests. But can foreign involvement stem the tide of graft and uncontrolled logging that has steadily decimated one of the world’s largest areas of rainforest? READ MORE

29 Nov 2010

Sustainable Palm Oil: Rainforest Savior or Fig Leaf?

by FRED PEARCE
The push to promote sustainable palm oil is turning into a test case for green consumerism. The outcome could help determine the future of the rainforests of Asia and Africa — and whether consumer pressure can really sway corporate giants. READ MORE

15 Nov 2010

With Tigers Near Extinction, A Last-Ditch Strategy Emerges

by CAROLINE FRASER
In the past century, populations of wild tigers have plummeted from 100,000 to 3,500. Now the World Bank and conservationists have launched an eleventh-hour effort to save this great predator, focusing on reining in the black market for tiger parts and ending the destruction of tiger habitat. READ MORE

04 Nov 2010

In War-Scarred Landscape, Vietnam Replants Its Forests

by MIKE IVES
With large swaths of forest destroyed by wartime defoliants, and even larger areas lost to post-war logging, Vietnam has set an ambitious goal for regenerating its woodlands. But proponents of reintroducing native tree species face resistance from a timber industry that favors fast-growing exotics like acacia. READ MORE

21 Oct 2010

Hungary’s Red Sludge Spill: The Media and the Eco-Disaster

by ELISABETH ROSENTHAL
The sludge spill in Hungary dominated world news for days, as horrific images of red-mud rivers appeared nonstop on the Internet, newspaper front pages, and TV screens. Yet other environmental threats — less visible, but potentially more devastating — often go largely unnoticed. READ MORE

29 Sep 2010

Forging a Landmark Agreement To Save Canada’s Boreal Forest

Last spring, conservation groups and timber companies signed an historic agreement to protect a large swath of Canada’s boreal forest. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, the Pew Environment Group's Steven E. Kallick, a key player in the agreement, explains why the accord is integral to a larger plan to eventually preserve half of Canada’s extensive boreal forests. READ MORE

23 Sep 2010

A Troubling Decline in the Caribou Herds of the Arctic

by ED STRUZIK
Across the Far North, populations of caribou — an indispensable source of food and clothing for indigenous people — are in steep decline. Scientists point to rising temperatures and a resource-development boom as the prime culprits. READ MORE

16 Sep 2010

In Scotland’s Search for Roots, A Push to Restore Wild Lands

by CAROLINE FRASER
As Scotland asserts its identity and its autonomy, environmentalists are working to restore its denuded landscape – planting native forests, creating wildlife corridors, and reintroducing species that were wiped out centuries ago. READ MORE

13 Sep 2010

Deep in Ecuador’s Rainforest, A Plan to Forego an Oil Bonanza

by KELLY HEARN
Ecuador's Yasuni National Park is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth and is home to remote Indian tribes. It also sits atop a billion barrels of oil. Now, Ecuador and the United Nations are forging an ambitious plan to walk away from drilling in the park in exchange for payments from the international community. READ MORE

01 Jul 2010

As Madagascar is Plundered, A Staunch Defender Fights Back

by STEVEN KOTLER
Primatologist Patricia Wright has spent the past 25 years studying — and protecting — Madagascar’s rich yet highly threatened biodiversity. Now, as many of the island’s remaining forests are being felled in the wake of a 2009 coup, Wright describes how she is helping organize the local residents and international conservation organizations to fight back. READ MORE

24 Jun 2010

In the Fight to Save Forests, Activists Target Corporations

by RHETT BUTLER
Large corporations, not small-scale farmers, are now the major forces behind the destruction of the world’s tropical forests. From the Amazon to Madagascar, activists have been directing their actions at these companies — so far with limited success. READ MORE

27 May 2010

Will REDD Preserve Forests Or Merely Provide a Fig Leaf?

by FRED PEARCE
The tropical forest conservation plan, known as REDD, has the potential to significantly reduce deforestation and carbon dioxide emissions worldwide. But unless projects are carefully designed and monitored, the program could be undercut by shady dealings at all levels, from the forests to global carbon markets. READ MORE

15 Mar 2010

What’s Killing the Great Forests of the American West?

by JIM ROBBINS
Across western North America, huge tracts of forest are dying off at an extraordinary rate, mostly because of outbreaks of insects. Scientists are now seeing such forest die-offs around the world and are linking them to changes in climate.   READ MORE

11 Jan 2010

Arctic Tundra is Being Lost As Far North Quickly Warms

by BILL SHERWONIT
The treeless ecosystem of mosses, lichens, and berry plants is giving way to shrub land and boreal forest. As scientists study the transformation, they are discovering that major warming-related events, including fires and the collapse of slopes due to melting permafrost, are leading to the loss of tundra in the Arctic. READ MORE

04 Jan 2010

Madagascar’s Political Chaos Threatens Conservation Gains

by RHETT BUTLER
Since the government's collapse after a coup last March, Madagascar's rainforests have been plundered for their precious wood and unique wildlife. But now there are a few encouraging signs, as officials promise a crackdown on illegal logging and ecotourists begin to return to the island. READ MORE

29 Oct 2009

In Japan’s Managed Landscape, a Struggle to Save the Bears

by WINIFRED BIRD
Although it is a heavily urbanized nation, fully two-thirds of Japan remains woodlands. Yet many of the forests are timber plantations inhospitable to wildlife, especially black bears, which are struggling to survive in one of the most densely populated countries on Earth. READ MORE

15 Oct 2009

The Spread of New Diseases and the Climate Connection

by SONIA SHAH
As humans increasingly encroach on forested lands and as temperatures rise, the transmission of disease from animals and insects to people is growing. Now a new field, known as “conservation medicine,” is exploring how ecosystem disturbance and changing interactions between wildlife and humans can lead to the spread of new pathogens. READ MORE

14 Oct 2009

Leveling Appalachia: The Legacy of Mountaintop Removal Mining

During the last two decades, mountaintop removal mining in Appalachia has destroyed or severely damaged more than a million acres of forest and buried nearly 2,000 miles of streams. Leveling Appalachia: The Legacy of Mountaintop Removal Mining, a video report produced by Yale Environment 360 in collaboration with MediaStorm, focuses on the environmental and social impacts of this practice and examines the long-term effects on the region’s forests and waterways.
READ MORE

20 Aug 2009

Finding Common Ground on Protecting Montana Wilderness

by RICK BASS
In the Yaak Valley of Montana, environmentalists have been talking to loggers, snowmobilers and other longtime opponents of wilderness protection about the future of public lands. Their accord is part of a cooperative effort that could lead to the first wilderness-area designation in the state in a quarter century. READ MORE

10 Aug 2009

Controlling the Ranching Boom that Threatens the Amazon

by RHETT BUTLER
Clearing land for cattle is responsible for 80 percent of rainforest loss in the Brazilian Amazon. But with Amazon ranching now a multi-billion dollar business, corporate buyers of beef and leather, including Wal-Mart, are starting to demand that the destruction of the forest be halted. READ MORE

20 Jul 2009

Mountaintop Mining Legacy: Destroying Appalachia’s Streams

by JOHN MCQUAID
The environmental damage caused by mountaintop removal mining across Appalachia has been well documented. But scientists are now beginning to understand that the mining operations’ most lasting damage may be caused by the massive amounts of debris dumped into valley streams. READ MORE

25 Jun 2009

With the Clearing of Forests, Baby Orangutans Are Marooned

by RHETT BUTLER
As Borneo's rain forests are razed for oil palm plantations, wildlife centers are taking in more and more orphaned orangutans and preparing them for reintroduction into the wild. But the endangered primates now face a new threat — there is not enough habitat where they can be returned. READ MORE

22 Jun 2009

A Plea to President Obama: End Mountaintop Coal Mining

by JAMES HANSEN
Tighter restrictions on mountaintop removal mining are simply not enough. Instead, a leading climate scientist argues, the Obama administration must prohibit this destructive practice, which is devastating vast stretches of Appalachia. READ MORE

14 May 2009

Yellowstone’s Grizzly Bears Face Threats on Two Fronts

by DOUG PEACOCK
The magnificent creature at the heart of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem now confronts two grave perils: the loss of its key food source because of rising temperatures, and increased killing by humans. A renowned grizzly expert argues that it’s time to once again protect Yellowstone’s grizzlies under the Endangered Species Act. READ MORE

12 May 2009

The Razing of Appalachia: Mountaintop Removal Revisited

by JOHN MCQUAID
Over the past two decades, mountaintop removal mining in Appalachia has obliterated or severely damaged more than a million acres of forest and buried more than 1,000 miles of streams. Now, the Obama administration is showing signs it plans to crack down on this destructive practice. READ MORE

26 Feb 2009

Laos Emerges as Key Source in Asia’s Illicit Wildlife Trade

by RHETT BUTLER
Long an isolated land with abundant forests and biodiversity, Laos is rapidly developing as China and other Asian nations exploit its resources. One of the first casualties has been the wildlife, now being rapidly depleted by a thriving black-market trade. READ MORE

11 Dec 2008

As Rain Forests Disappear, A Market Solution Emerges

by RHETT BUTLER
Despite the creation of protected areas in the Amazon and other tropical regions, rain forests worldwide are still being destroyed for a simple reason: They are worth more cut down than standing. But with deforestation now a leading driver of global warming, a movement is growing to pay nations and local people to keep their rain forests intact. READ MORE

17 Nov 2008

Offshore Drilling in Alaska: Time to Slow the Rush

by MARGARET WILLIAMS
In the last eight years, vast areas of offshore Alaska have been opened to oil drilling. Now, a conservationist argues, the Obama administration must reverse the Bush-era policies if the state is to avoid irreparable harm to Arctic wildlife and to some of the most biologically productive waters on earth. READ MORE

19 Jun 2008

Global Commodities Boom Fuels New Assault on Amazon

by RHETT BUTLER
With soaring prices for agricultural goods and new demand for biofuels, the clearing of the world's largest rain forest has accelerated dramatically. Unless forceful measures are taken, half of the Brazilian Amazon could be cut, burned or dried out within 20 years. READ MORE

e360 digest

18 Sep 2014: Trees Growing Significantly Faster in Warming Climate, Study Finds

11 Sep 2014: Brazilian Amazon Deforestation Jumps by 29 Percent, Government Says

20 Aug 2014: Interview: Drones Are Emerging As Valuable Conservation Tool

06 Aug 2014: Western U.S. In Its Quietest Fire Season In A Decade, Officials Report

05 Aug 2014: Forests Already Seeing Effects of Climate Change, European Researchers Say

30 Jul 2014: New Maps of Peru Forests Could Help Set Conservation Priorities

28 Jul 2014: Trees Save Lives and Billions in Health Costs Annually, Forest Service Finds

24 Jul 2014: Protecting Community Forests Is a Major Tool in Climate Fight, Study Says

23 Jul 2014: Earth Observation Satellites Help Scientists Understand Global Change

03 Jul 2014: Human Activity Has Boosted Plant Growth Globally, NASA Data Show


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