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Archive: Reports

Report

A New Frontier for Fracking: Drilling Near the Arctic Circle

by ED STRUZIK
Hydraulic fracturing is about to move into the Canadian Arctic, with companies exploring the region's rich shale oil deposits. But many indigenous people and conservationists have serious concerns about the impact of fracking in more fragile northern environments. READ MORE

Report

Africa’s Vultures Threatened By An Assault on All Fronts

by MADELINE BODIN
Vultures are being killed on an unprecedented scale across Africa, with the latest slaughter perpetrated by elephant poachers who poison the scavenging birds so they won’t give away the location of their activities. READ MORE

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As Small Hydropower Expands, So Does Caution on Its Impacts

by DAVE LEVITAN
Small hydropower projects have the potential to bring electricity to millions of people now living off the grid. But experts warn that planners must carefully consider the cumulative effects of constructing too many small dams in a single watershed. READ MORE

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Why Restoring Wetlands Is More Critical Than Ever

by BRUCE STUTZ
Along the Delaware River estuary, efforts are underway to restore wetlands lost due to centuries of human activity. With sea levels rising, coastal communities there and and elsewhere in the U.S. and Europe are realizing the value of wetlands as important buffers against flooding and tidal surges. READ MORE

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Primate Rights vs Research: Battle in Colombian Rainforest

by CHRIS KRAUL
A Colombian conservationist has been locked in a contentious legal fight against a leading researcher who uses wild monkeys in his search for a malaria vaccine. A recent court decision that banned the practice is seen as a victory in efforts to restrict the use of monkeys in medical research. READ MORE

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Scientists Look for Causes of Baffling Die-Off of Sea Stars

by ERIC WAGNER
Sea stars on both coasts of North America are dying en masse from a disease that kills them in a matter of days. Researchers are looking at various pathogens that may be behind what is known as sea star wasting syndrome, but they suspect that a key contributing factor is warming ocean waters. READ MORE

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Loss of Snowpack and Glaciers In Rockies Poses Water Threat

by ED STRUZIK
From the Columbia River basin in the U.S. to the Prairie Provinces of Canada, scientists and policy makers are confronting a future in which the loss of snow and ice in the Rocky Mountains could imperil water supplies for agriculture, cities and towns, and hydropower production. READ MORE

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On Front Lines of Recycling, Turning Food Waste into Biogas

by RACHEL CERNANSKY
An increasing number of sewage treatment plants in the U.S. and Europe are processing food waste in anaerobic biodigesters, keeping more garbage out of landfills, reducing methane emissions, and producing energy to defray their operating costs. READ MORE

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Can Waterless Dyeing Processes Clean Up the Clothing Industry?

by LYDIA HEIDA
One of the world’s most polluting industries is the textile-dyeing sector, which in China and other Asian nations releases trillions of liters of chemically tainted wastewater. But new waterless dyeing technologies, if adopted on a large scale, could sharply cut pollution from the clothing industry. READ MORE

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How Weeds Could Help Feed Billions in a Warming World

by LISA PALMER
Scientists in the U.S. and elsewhere are conducting intensive experiments to cross hardy weeds with food crops such as rice and wheat. Their goal is to make these staples more resilient as higher temperatures, drought, and elevated CO2 levels pose new threats to the world’s food supply. READ MORE

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New Desalination Technologies Spur Growth in Recyling Water

by CHERYL KATZ
Desalination has long been associated with one process — turning seawater into drinking water. But a host of new technologies are being developed that not only are improving traditional desalination but opening up new frontiers in reusing everything from agricultural water to industrial effluent. READ MORE

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As Dairy Farms Grow Bigger, New Concerns About Pollution

by ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
Dairy operations in the U.S. are consolidating, with ever-larger numbers of cows concentrated on single farms. In states like Wisconsin, opposition to some large operations is growing after manure spills and improper handling of waste have contaminated waterways and aquifers. READ MORE

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In New Delhi, A Rough Road For Bus Rapid Transit Systems

by MIKE IVES
High-speed bus systems in crowded urban areas have taken off from Brazil to China, but introducing this form of mass transit to the teeming Indian capital of New Delhi has proven to be a vexing challenge. READ MORE

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Mimicking Nature, New Designs Ease Fish Passage Around Dams

by REBECCA KESSLER
Originating in Europe, "nature-like" fishways are now being constructed on some U.S. rivers where removing dams is not an option. Unlike traditional fish ladders, these passages use a natural approach aimed at significantly increasing once-abundant runs of migratory fish. READ MORE

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In a Troubled African Park, A Battle Over Oil Exploration

by FRED PEARCE
Congo's Virunga National Park has long been known for its mountain gorillas and for the lawless militias that operate there. But the recent shooting of the park warden and plans to begin oil exploration in the park have sparked concern about the future of this iconic World Heritage Site. READ MORE

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Mining Showdown in Andes Over Unique Páramo Lands

by CHRIS KRAUL
High-altitude neotropical ecosystems known as páramos are increasingly at risk in Colombia and elsewhere in South America as major mining companies seek to exploit rich deposits of gold and other minerals. Such projects, scientists warn, could have serious impacts on critical water supplies. READ MORE

Report

Unsustainable Seafood: A New Crackdown on Illegal Fishing

by RICHARD CONNIFF
A recent study shows that a surprisingly large amount of the seafood sold in U.S. markets is caught illegally. In a series of actions over the last few months, governments and international regulators have started taking aim at stopping this illicit trade in contraband fish. READ MORE

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A Public Relations Drive to Stop Illegal Rhino Horn Trade

by MIKE IVES
Conservation groups are mounting campaigns to persuade Vietnamese consumers that buying rhino horn is decidedly uncool. But such efforts are likely to succeed only as part of a broader initiative to crack down on an illicit trade that is decimating African rhino populations. READ MORE

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On Fracking Front, A Push To Reduce Leaks of Methane

by ROGER REAL DROUIN
Scientists, engineers, and government regulators are increasingly turning their attention to solving one of the chief environmental problems associated with fracking for natural gas and oil – significant leaks of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. READ MORE

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Scientists Focus on Polar Waters As Threat of Acidification Grows

by JO CHANDLER
A sophisticated and challenging experiment in Antarctica is the latest effort to study ocean acidification in the polar regions, where frigid waters are expected to feel most acutely the ecological impacts of acidic conditions not seen in millions of years. READ MORE

Report

On Ravaged Tar Sands Lands, Big Challenges for Reclamation

by ED STRUZIK
The mining of Canada’s tar sands has destroyed large areas of sensitive wetlands in Alberta. Oil sands companies have vowed to reclaim this land, but little restoration has occurred so far and many scientists say it is virtually impossible to rebuild these complex ecosystems. READ MORE

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A New Leaf in the Rainforest: Longtime Villain Vows Reform

by RHETT BUTLER
Few companies have done as much damage to the world’s tropical forests as Asia Pulp & Paper. But under intense pressure from its customers and conservation groups, APP has embarked on a series of changes that could significantly reduce deforestation in Indonesia and serve as a model for forestry reform. READ MORE

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In a Host of Small Sources, Scientists See Energy Windfall

by CHERYL KATZ
The emerging field of “energy scavenging” is drawing on a wide array of untapped energy sources­ — including radio waves, vibrations created by moving objects, and waste heat from computers or car exhaust systems — to generate electricity and boost efficiency. READ MORE

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Life on Mekong Faces Threats As Major Dams Begin to Rise

by JOSHUA ZAFFOS
With a massive dam under construction in Laos and other dams on the way, the Mekong River is facing a wave of hydroelectric projects that could profoundly alter the river’s ecology and disrupt the food supplies of millions of people in Southeast Asia. READ MORE

Report

As Fracking Booms, Growing Concerns About Wastewater

by ROGER REAL DROUIN
With hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas continuing to proliferate across the U.S., scientists and environmental activists are raising questions about whether millions of gallons of contaminated drilling fluids could be threatening water supplies and human health. READ MORE

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In Developing World, A Push to Bring E-Waste Out of Shadows

by MIKE IVES
For decades, hazardous electronic waste from around the world has been processed in unsafe backyard recycling operations in Asia and Africa. Now, a small but growing movement is seeking to provide these informal collectors with incentives to sell e-waste to advanced recycling facilities. READ MORE

Report

Growing Insects: Farmers Can Help to Bring Back Pollinators

by RICHARD CONNIFF
With a sharp decline in pollinating insects, farmers are being encouraged to grow flowering plants that can support these important insects. It’s a fledgling movement that could help restore the pollinators that are essential for world food production. READ MORE

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Northern Mystery: Why Are Birds of the Arctic in Decline?

by ED STRUZIK
With some species of Arctic birds experiencing steep drops in population and their prey also undergoing marked shifts, scientists are working to understand what role climate change is playing in these unfolding ecological transformations. READ MORE

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Indian Microgrids Aim to Bring Millions Out of Darkness

by DAVID FERRIS
Powered by solar panels and biomass, microgrids are spreading slowly across India, where 300 million people live without electricity. But can these off-grid technologies be scaled-up to bring low-carbon power to tens of millions of people? READ MORE

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Solar Geoengineering: Weighing Costs of Blocking the Sun’s Rays

by NICOLA JONES
With prominent scientists now calling for experiments to test whether pumping sulfates into the atmosphere could safely counteract global warming, critics worry that the world community may be moving a step closer to deploying this controversial technology. READ MORE

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In Imperiled Forests of Borneo, A Rich Tropical Eden Endures

by WILLIAM LAURANCE
In Borneo's Danum Valley — one of the last, untouched forest reserves in a region ravaged by logging and oil palm cultivation — a team of international and Malaysian scientists is fighting to preserve an area of stunning biodiversity. READ MORE

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Singapore Takes the Lead In Green Building in Asia

by MIKE IVES
By encouraging the adoption of innovative architectural design and energy-saving technologies, Singapore has emerged as a model of green building in Asia — an important development in a region that is urbanizing more rapidly than any other in the world. READ MORE

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Out of India’s Trash Heaps, A Controversy on Incineration

by DAVID FERRIS
India is planning to burn more of its trash to generate badly needed electricity. But as the case of a waste-to-energy plant in New Delhi shows, critics are worried about lax air pollution controls and the impact of incineration on people who eke out a living picking through waste dumps. READ MORE

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A North Atlantic Mystery: Case of the Missing Whales

by REBECCA KESSLER
Endangered North Atlantic right whales are disappearing from customary feeding grounds off the U.S. and Canadian coasts and appearing in large numbers in other locations, leaving scientists to wonder if shifts in climate may be behind the changes. READ MORE

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For Utility-Scale Solar Industry, Key Questions About the Future

by DAVE LEVITAN
Large-scale solar projects are enjoying steady growth in California and the southwestern United States. But will shifting government incentives and mandates slow the expansion of this key part of the solar energy industry? READ MORE

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A Scarcity of Rare Metals Is Hindering Green Technologies

by NICOLA JONES
A shortage of "rare earth" metals, used in everything from electric car batteries to solar panels to wind turbines, is hampering the growth of renewable energy technologies. Researchers are now working to find alternatives to these critical elements or better ways to recycle them. READ MORE

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Canada’s Great Inland Delta: A Precarious Future Looms

by ED STRUZIK
The Peace-Athabasca Delta, one of the world’s largest freshwater deltas, is facing major change as rising temperatures, a prolonged drought, and water withdrawals for Alberta’s tar sands industry threaten to increasingly dry out this vast expanse of waterways and wetlands. READ MORE

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People or Parks: The Human Factor in Protecting Wildlife

by RICHARD CONNIFF
Recent studies in Asia and Australia found that community-managed areas can sometimes do better than traditional parks at preserving habitat and biodiversity. When it comes to conservation, maybe local people are not the problem, but the solution. READ MORE

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The Ambitious Restoration of An Undammed Western River

by CAROLINE FRASER
With the dismantling of two dams on Washington state’s Elwha River, the world’s largest dam removal project is almost complete. Now, in one of the most extensive U.S. ecological restorations ever attempted, efforts are underway to revive one of the Pacific Northwest’s great salmon rivers. READ MORE

Report

In Japan, Captive Breeding May Help Save the Wild Eel

by WINIFRED BIRD
As eel populations plummet worldwide, Japanese scientists are racing to solve a major challenge for aquaculture — how to replicate the life cycle of eels in captivity and commercially produce a fish that is a prized delicacy on Asian dinner tables. READ MORE

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Iceland Seeks to Cash In On Its Abundant Renewable Energy

by CHERYL KATZ
Still reeling from recent financial crises, Iceland is hoping to use its bountiful sources of geothermal and hydroelectric energy to help boost its economy. Among the country’s more ambitious plans is an undersea cable to carry renewably generated electricity to the U.K. READ MORE

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In Galápagos, An Insidious Threat to Darwin's Finches

by ELIZABETH KOLBERT
The birds that have come to be known as Darwin's finches have long intrigued students of evolution. But now a parasitic fly introduced to the Galápagos Islands is threatening the future of one or more of these iconic finch species. READ MORE

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Will Offshore Wind Finally Take Off on U.S. East Coast?

by DAVE LEVITAN
After years of delays and legal battles, several offshore wind projects seem poised to be launched off the U.S. East Coast. But the lack of stable government incentives and tax credits may continue to hobble an industry that already has a strong foothold in Europe. READ MORE

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Poaching Pangolins: An Obscure Creature Faces Uncertain Future

by RICHARD CONNIFF
The pangolin does not make headlines the way elephants or rhinos do. But the survival of this uncharismatic, armor-plated animal is being threatened by a gruesome trade in its meat and its scales. READ MORE

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How Tiny Fish Could Reveal Effects of Chemical Exposure

by ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
Researchers at a lab at Oregon State University are using zebrafish to assess the impacts of multiple chemical exposures. Their findings could help lead to a better understanding of how chemicals in the environment and in consumer products affect human health. READ MORE

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With Rooftop Solar on Rise, U.S. Utilities Are Striking Back

by MARC GUNTHER
Faced with the prospect of a dwindling customer base, some U.S. power companies are seeking to end public subsidies and other incentives for rooftop solar. In Arizona, the issue has sparked a heated public relations battle that could help determine the future of solar in the United States. READ MORE

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Incineration Versus Recycling: In Europe, A Debate Over Trash

by NATE SELTENRICH
Increasingly common in Europe, municipal “waste-to-energy” incinerators are being touted as a green trash-disposal alternative. But critics contend that these large-scale incinerators tend to discourage recycling and lead to greater waste. READ MORE

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Bringing Back the Night: A Fight Against Light Pollution

by PAUL BOGARD
As evidence mounts that excessive use of light is harming wildlife and adversely affecting human health, new initiatives in France and elsewhere are seeking to turn down the lights that flood an ever-growing part of the planet. READ MORE

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The War on African Poaching: Is Militarization Doomed to Fail?

by ADAM WELZ
African countries and private game reserves are engaging in an increasingly sophisticated arms race against poachers, yet the slaughter of elephants and rhinos continues. Some experts argue that the battle must be joined on a far wider front that targets demand in Asia and judicial dysfunction in Africa. READ MORE

Report

Recycling’s ‘Final Frontier’: The Composting of Food Waste

by DAVE LEVITAN
A move by New York City to begin collecting food scraps and other organic waste is just the latest example of expanding efforts by municipalities worldwide to recycle large quantities of unused food and slash the amount of material sent to landfills. READ MORE

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With Tar Sands Development, Growing Concern on Water Use

by ED STRUZIK
Environmental questions about Canada’s massive tar sands development have long centered on greenhouse gas emissions. Now there are mounting concerns about the huge volumes of water used by the oil industry and the impact on the vast Mackenzie River Basin. READ MORE

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The Rise of Rubber Takes Toll On Forests of Southwest China

by MIKE IVES
In one of China’s most biodiverse regions, the spread of rubber plantations to supply the country’s burgeoning automobile industry is carving up habitat and harming watersheds and tropical forest ecosystems. READ MORE

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In Mekong Delta, Rice Boom Has Steep Environmental Cost

by MIKE IVES
Vietnam has become one of the world’s leading rice producers, thanks to the construction of an elaborate network of dikes and irrigation canals. But these extensive infrastructure projects in the storied Mekong Delta have come at a high ecological price. READ MORE

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Molecular Detective Work Yields Big Gains for Ecology

by MADELINE BODIN
The field of stable isotope analysis was once the realm of geologists and anthropologists. But rapid advances and plummeting costs mean that environmental scientists are increasingly using the technology to gain insight into the migration and behavior of various animals. READ MORE

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New Initiatives to Clean Up The Global Aquarium Trade

by REBECCA KESSLER
An estimated 30 million fish and other creatures are caught annually to supply the home aquarium market, taking a toll on some reef ecosystems. Now conservationists are working to improve the industry by ending destructive practices and encouraging aquaculture. READ MORE

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Marines Push to Front Lines in Renewable Energy Innovation

by JUSTIN GERDES
A backpack that generates electricity? A vest that cools you in a hot tent? As the U.S. military looks to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels, the Marine Corps is leading the way with cutting-edge technology and innovative devices. READ MORE

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An Economic Boom in Turkey Takes a Toll on Marine Life

by SULMAAN KHAN
The development-at-any-cost policies of Turkish Prime Minister Recip Tayyip Erdogan — a key factor behind the protests and clashes in Istanbul’s Taksim Square — are also playing a role in the steady decline of the nation’s porpoises, dolphins, and other marine life. READ MORE

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The Surprising Role of CO2 in Changes on the African Savanna

by ADAM WELZ
Recent studies show that many of the world’s savannas, including famed southern African landscapes, are experiencing significant change as rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere favor the growth of trees over grasslands. READ MORE

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Green Highways: New Strategies To Manage Roadsides as Habitat

by RICHARD CONNIFF
From northern Europe to Florida, highway planners are rethinking roadsides as potential habitat for native plants and wildlife. Scientists say this new approach could provide a useful tool in fostering biodiversity. READ MORE

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China’s New Arctic Presence Signals Future Development

by ED STRUZIK
China’s recent admission to the Arctic Council under observer status reflects a new reality: the world’s economic powers now regard development of natural resources and commerce in an increasingly ice-free Arctic as a top priority. READ MORE

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A Plague of Deforestation Sweeps Across Southeast Asia

by DANIEL DROLLETTE
Illegal logging and unchecked economic development are taking a devastating toll on the forests of Vietnam and neighboring countries, threatening areas of biodiversity so rich that 1,700 species have been discovered in the last 15 years alone. READ MORE

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In Post-Tsunami Japan, A Push To Rebuild Coast in Concrete

by WINIFRED BIRD
In the wake of the 2011 tsunami, the Japanese government is forgoing an opportunity to sustainably protect its coastline and is instead building towering concrete seawalls and other defenses that environmentalists say will inflict serious damage on coastal ecosystems. READ MORE

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How Mussel Farming Could Help to Clean Fouled Waters

by PAUL GREENBERG
Along the shores of New York Harbor, scientists are investigating whether this ubiquitous bivalve can be grown in urban areas as a way of cleansing coastal waters of sewage, fertilizers, and other pollutants. READ MORE

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Will Lead Bullets Finally Kill Off the California Condor?

by TED WILLIAMS
The California condor, the largest bird in North America, was saved from extinction by a captive breeding program that increased its numbers in the wild. But now the condor is facing a new and pernicious threat — the lead from bullets used by game hunters. READ MORE

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A Key Experiment to Probe the Future of Our Acidifying Oceans

by PETER FRIEDERICI
In a Swedish fjord, European researchers are conducting an ambitious experiment aimed at better understanding how ocean acidification will affect marine life. Ultimately, these scientists hope to determine which species might win and which might lose in a more acidic ocean. READ MORE

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Declining Bee Populations Pose A Threat to Global Agriculture

by ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
The danger that the decline of bees and other pollinators represents to the world’s food supply was highlighted this week when the European Commission decided to ban a class of pesticides suspected of playing a role in so-called “colony collapse disorder.” READ MORE

Report

Fires Burn More Fiercely As Northern Forests Warm

by DYLAN WALSH
From North America to Siberia, rising temperatures and drier woodlands are leading to a longer burning season and a significant increase in forest fires. Scientists warn that this trend is expected continue in the years ahead. READ MORE

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Will Electric Bicycles Get Americans to Start Pedaling?

by MARC GUNTHER
Electric bicycles are already popular in Europe and in China, which has more e-bikes than cars on its roads. Now, manufacturers are marketing e-bikes in the U.S., promoting them as a "green" alternative to driving. READ MORE

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Copenhagen’s Ambitious Push To Be Carbon Neutral by 2025

by JUSTIN GERDES
The Danish capital is moving rapidly toward a zero-carbon future, as it erects wind farms, transforms its citywide heating systems, promotes energy efficiency, and lures more people out of their cars and onto public transportation and bikes. READ MORE

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How Ontario Is Putting an End To Coal-Burning Power Plants

by KEITH SCHNEIDER
Ontario is on the verge of becoming the first industrial region in North America to eliminate all coal-fired electrical generation. Here’s how Canada’s most populous province did it — and what the U.S. and others can learn from it. READ MORE

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Long Outlawed in the West, Lead Paint Sold in Poor Nations

by REBECCA KESSLER
A new study finds that household lead paint — banned for years in the U.S. and Europe because of its health effects on children — is commonly sold in the African nation of Cameroon. Is lead paint the latest case of Western companies selling unsafe products in developing countries? READ MORE

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Can a Divestment Campaign Move the Fossil Fuel Industry?

by BROOKE JARVIS
U.S. climate activists have launched a movement to persuade universities, cities, and other groups to sell off their investments in fossil fuel companies. But while the financial impact of such divestment may be limited, the campaign could harm the companies in a critical sphere — public opinion. READ MORE

Report

Why a Highly Promising Electric Car Start-Up Is Failing

by MARC GUNTHER
Better Place was touted as one of the world’s most innovative electric vehicle start-ups when it launched six years ago. But after selling fewer than 750 cars in a major initiative in Israel and losing more than $500 million, the company’s experience shows that EVs are still not ready for primetime. READ MORE

Report

In Tibet, Change Comes to the Once-Pristine Roof of the World

by GEORGE SCHALLER
Renowned biologist George Schaller has been traveling to the Tibetan Plateau for nearly three decades, studying its unique wildlife. But with climate change and overgrazing taking a toll on the landscape, he reports, scientists and the Chinese government are working to preserve one of the planet’s wildest places. READ MORE

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To Control Floods, The Dutch Turn to Nature for Inspiration

by CHERYL KATZ
The Netherlands’ system of dikes and sea gates has long been the best in the world. But as the country confronts the challenges of climate change, it is increasingly relying on techniques that mimic natural systems and harness nature’s power to hold back the sea. READ MORE

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Grisly Trend: Green Activists Are Facing Deadly Dangers

by FRED PEARCE
With activists killed in Brazil, Cambodia, the Philippines, and elsewhere, 2012 may have been the worst year yet for violence against those working to protect the environment. So far, little has been done to halt this chilling development. READ MORE

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Will Bold Steps Be Needed to Save Beleaguered Polar Bears?

by ED STRUZIK
In a new paper, the world’s leading polar bear scientists say the time has come to consider drastic measures to save these iconic animals, including supplemental feeding by humans during ice-free periods and relocating more southerly populations to the High Arctic. READ MORE

Report

Boom in Mining Rare Earths Poses Mounting Toxic Risks

by MIKE IVES
The mining of rare earth metals, used in everything from smart phones to wind turbines, has long been dominated by China. But as mining of these key elements spreads to countries like Malaysia and Brazil, scientists warn of the dangers of the toxic and radioactive waste generated by the mines and processing plants. READ MORE

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To Tackle Runoff, Cities Turn to Green Initiatives

by DAVE LEVITAN
Urban stormwater runoff is a serious problem, overloading sewage treatment plants and polluting waterways. Now, various U.S. cities are creating innovative green infrastructure — such as rain gardens and roadside plantings — that mimics the way nature collects and cleanses water. READ MORE

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Proposed Energy Exploration Sparks Worry on Ocean Canyons

by PAUL GREENBERG
The Atlantic Canyons off the Northeastern U.S. plunge as deep as 15,000 feet and harbor diverse and fragile marine ecosystems. Now, the Obama administration’s plans to consider offshore oil and gas exploration in the canyons is troubling conservationists. READ MORE

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Reviving Europe’s Biodiversity By Importing Exotic Animals

by CHRISTIAN SCHWäGERL
Scientists are conducting intriguing — and counterintuitive — experiments at several sites in Germany: Bringing back long-lost herbivores, such as water buffalo, to encourage the spread of native plants that have fared poorly in Europe’s human-dominated landscape. READ MORE

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In Midwest, Bringing Back Native Prairies Yard by Yard

by REBECCA KESSLER
Across the U.S. Midwest, homeowners are restoring their yards and former farmland to the native prairie that existed in pre-settlement days. The benefits can be substantial — maintenance that uses less water and no fertilizer, and an ecosystem that supports wildflowers and wildlife. READ MORE

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Too Big to Flood? Megacities Face Future of Major Storm Risk

by BRUCE STUTZ
As economic activity and populations continue to expand in coastal urban areas, particularly in Asia, hundreds of trillions of dollars of infrastructure, industrial and office buildings, and homes are increasingly at risk from intensifying storms and rising sea levels. READ MORE

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Should Environmentalists Just Say No to Eating Beef?

by MARC GUNTHER
Conservation organizations are working with industry to try to make beef production more sustainable. But some are questioning whether green groups should be accepting funds from the beef industry or whether they should instead be urging consumers to stop eating beef. READ MORE

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How Data and Social Pressure Can Reduce Home Energy Use

by DAVE LEVITAN
With the relationship between utilities and their customers changing in unprecedented ways, new companies are deploying vast amounts of data and social psychology techniques to try to persuade people to use less electricity in their homes. READ MORE

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Tar Sands Oil Boom Drives Push for A Northern Pipeline

by ED STRUZIK
The rapid development of Alberta’s tar sands has spawned a new proposal for a 731-mile pipeline that would transport oil to the British Columbia coast. The project is strongly opposed by conservationists and First Nations leaders, who fear the environmental risks it would bring. READ MORE

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The Dirty War Against Africa’s Remaining Rhinos

by ADAM WELZ
The killing of rhinoceroses has escalated dramatically, especially in South Africa, which is home to 75 percent of the world’s rhino population. The slaughter is being orchestrated by brazen, highly organized gangs that smuggle the rhinos' horns to black markets in China and Southeast Asia. READ MORE

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As Myanmar Opens to World, Fate of Its Forests Is on the Line

by CHARLES SCHMIDT
Years of sanctions against Myanmar’s military regime helped protect its extensive wild lands. But as the country’s rulers relax their grip and welcome foreign investment, can the nation protect its forests and biodiversity while embracing development? READ MORE

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Battered New York City Looks For Ways to Hold Back the Sea

by BRUCE STUTZ
New York City had been gradually preparing for a world of rising seas and more powerful storms. But the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy is now forcing officials to consider spending billions of dollars on storm protection, including a network of surge barriers. READ MORE

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An Obsessive Quest to Document Earth’s Disappearing Glaciers

For the past six years, photographer James Balog has deployed dozens of time-lapse cameras around the world to chronicle one of the starkest examples of global warming — melting glaciers. In a Yale Environment 360 interview, Balog talks about his passion to capture these vanishing landscapes. READ MORE

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How Fishing Gear is Killing Whales in the North Atlantic

by REBECCA KESSLER
Researchers have been documenting the deadly threat that fishing lines and ropes pose to large whales that become entangled in them. Now, new studies are pointing to another disturbing fact: the ensnared whales endure enormous pain and prolonged suffering. READ MORE

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Green Crude: The Quest to Unlock Algae’s Energy Potential

by MARC GUNTHER
A host of startup companies are pursuing new technologies that they claim will soon lead to large-scale commercialization of biofuels made from algae. But questions remain about the viability and environmental benefits of what some of its developers are calling “green crude.” READ MORE

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How No-Flush Toilets Can Help Make a Healthier World

by CHERYL COLOPY
Inadequate sewage systems and the lack of toilets in much of the developing world have created a major public health and environmental crisis. Now various innovators are promoting new kinds of toilets and technologies that use little or no water and recycle the waste. READ MORE

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In the Land of the Maya, A Battle for a Vital Forest

by WILLIAM ALLEN
In Guatemala’s vast Maya Biosphere Reserve, conservation groups are battling to preserve a unique rainforest now under threat from Mexican drug cartels, Salvadoran drug gangs, and Chinese-backed groups illegally logging prime tropical hardwoods. READ MORE

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As Arctic Melts, Inuit Face Tensions with Outside World

by ED STRUZIK
With Arctic summer sea ice rapidly disappearing, the native Inuit of Canada are encountering not only unsettling changes in their subsistence way of life, but also a growing number of outsiders who will further transform their once-isolated homeland. READ MORE

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High-Altitude Wind Energy: Huge Potential — And Hurdles

by DAVE LEVITAN
A host of start-up companies are exploring ways to harness the enormous amount of wind energy flowing around the earth, especially at high altitudes. But as these innovators are discovering, the engineering and regulatory challenges of what is known as airborne wind power are daunting. READ MORE

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For Obama and Romney, A Stark Contrast on Energy and Environment

As the U.S. presidential campaign enters its final phase, Yale Environment 360 compares the sharply divergent views of President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney on the environment and energy. READ MORE

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Beyond Big Dams: Turning to Grass Roots Solutions on Water

by FRED PEARCE
Mega-dams and massive government-run irrigation projects are not the key to meeting world’s water needs, a growing number of experts now say. For developing nations, the answer may lie in small-scale measures such as inexpensive water pumps and other readily available equipment. READ MORE

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At Edge of Peruvian Andes, Tracking Impacts of Warming

by ELIZABETH KOLBERT
The Andes in eastern Peru, with steep slopes and remarkable biodiversity, are what one scientist calls a “perfect laboratory” for studying the effects of climate change. E360 contributor Elizabeth Kolbert trekked there with researchers seeking to determine if tree populations can move uphill fast enough to survive warming temperatures. READ MORE

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For Electric Car Batteries, The Race for a Rapid Charge

by DAVE LEVITAN
The amount of time it takes to recharge lithium-ion batteries has been a major impediment to consumer acceptance of electric vehicles. But a host of companies and researchers are working intensively to develop a battery that can recharge in 10 minutes and power a car for hundreds of miles. READ MORE

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Arctic Tipping Point: A North Pole Without Ice

by FEN MONTAIGNE
Scientists say this year’s record declines in Arctic sea ice extent and volume are powerful evidence that the giant cap of ice at the top of the planet is on a trajectory to largely disappear in summer within a decade or two, with profound global consequences. READ MORE

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In Bolivia, A Battle Over A Highway and a Way of Life

by JEAN FRIEDMAN-RUDOVSKY
Growing conflicts over development in South America have come to a head in Bolivia, where indigenous groups are resisting a highway project that would slice through a national park. How Bolivia resolves this showdown could point the way for other regions seeking to balance economic growth and the environment. READ MORE

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With Funding Tight, Cities are Turning to Green Infrastructure

by JIM ROBBINS
From Seattle to Sweden, an ever-growing number of city and regional governments are using roof gardens, specially designed wetlands, and other forms of “green infrastructure” to rein in pollution from countless diffuse sources — and to save money. READ MORE

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Gauging the Impact of Warming On Asia’s Life-Giving Monsoons

by CHRISTINA LARSON
In Mongolia, U.S. scientists are studying climate clues in ancient tree rings to help answer a crucial question: How will global warming affect Asia’s monsoon rains, which supply water for agriculture and drinking to half the world’s population? READ MORE

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Easing The Collateral Damage That Fisheries Inflict on Seabirds

by JEREMY HANCE
Two recent studies highlight the harm that industrial fisheries are doing to the world’s seabirds, either by overharvesting the birds’ favorite prey or by drowning birds hooked on longlines. But tighter regulations and innovative technologies are starting to significantly reduce seabird “bycatch,” slashing it by 90 percent in some regions. READ MORE

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Shrimp Farms’ Tainted Legacy Is Target of Certification Drive

by MARC GUNTHER
As shrimp aquaculture has boomed globally to keep pace with surging demand, the environmental toll on mangroves and other coastal ecosystems has been severe. Now, conservation groups and some shrimp farmers are creating a certification scheme designed to clean up the industry and reward sustainable producers. READ MORE

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Melting Glaciers May Worsen Northwest China’s Water Woes

by MIKE IVES
In China’s sprawling Xinjiang region, where the population is growing and cotton farming is booming, a key river has been running dry in summer. Now a team of international scientists is grappling with a problem facing the Tarim River basin and other mountainous regions — how to secure water supplies as demands increase and glaciers melt. READ MORE

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Self-Driving Cars: Coming Soon to a Highway Near You

by DAVE LEVITAN
Vehicles that virtually drive themselves are no longer the stuff of science fiction, with Google and other companies working to develop self-driving cars. These automated vehicles not only offer improved safety and fewer traffic jams, but real environmental benefits as well. READ MORE

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Will Fish-Loving Japan Embrace Sustainable Seafood?

by WINIFRED BIRD
In fish-crazed Japan, where eating seafood is a vital part of the nation's culture, conservation groups are working with companies to persuade more Japanese to eat certified, sustainably caught seafood. It's an uphill struggle, but one that could have significant impact on the world's fisheries. READ MORE

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The Dead Sea is Dying: Can A Controversial Plan Save It?

by DAVE LEVITAN
The Dead Sea — the lowest terrestrial point on the planet — is dropping at an alarming rate, falling more than 1 meter a year. A $10 billion proposal to pipe water from the Red Sea is being opposed by conservationists, who point to alternatives that could help save one of the world’s great natural places. READ MORE

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A Desperate Effort to Save the Rainforest of Borneo

by RHETT BUTLER
The once-magnificent tropical forests of Borneo have been decimated by rampant logging and clearing for oil palm plantations. But in the Malaysian state of Sabah, a top official is fighting to reverse that trend by bringing sustainable forestry to the beleaguered island. READ MORE

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Can Environmentalists Learn To Love a Texas Coal Plant?

by MARC GUNTHER
A planned carbon capture and storage plant in West Texas is being billed as the “cleanest coal plant in the world.” But can the $3 billion project help move the global power industry toward the elusive goal of low-carbon electricity, or is it just another way of perpetuating fossil fuels? READ MORE

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The Pollution Fallout From Zimbabwe’s Blood Diamonds

by ANDREW MAMBONDIYANI
The regime of President Robert Mugabe has been accused of profiting from the Marange diamond fields in eastern Zimbabwe, garnering illicit funds that could be used to bolster his oppressive security forces. Now critics are alleging the government is failing to stop mining-waste pollution that is sickening livestock and local villagers. READ MORE

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Africa’s Ambitious Experiment To Preserve Threatened Wildlife

by CAROLINE FRASER
Five nations in southern Africa are joining together to create a huge conservation area that will extend across their borders and expand critical territory for elephants. But can these new protections reverse decades of decline for area wildlife while also benefiting the people who live there? READ MORE

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Melting Sea Ice Could Lead To Pressure on Arctic Fishery

by ED STRUZIK
With melting sea ice opening up previously inaccessible parts of the Arctic Ocean, the fishing industry sees a potential bonanza. But some scientists and government officials have begun calling for a moratorium on fishing in the region until the true state of the Arctic fishery is assessed. READ MORE

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Solar Windows: Transforming Buildings Into Energy Producers

by DAVE LEVITAN
The vast amount of glass in skyscrapers and office buildings represents enormous potential for an emerging technology that turns windows into solar panels. But major questions remain as to whether solar windows can be sufficiently inexpensive and efficient to be widely adopted. READ MORE

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Fighting A Last-Ditch Battle To Save the Rare Javan Rhino

by RHETT BUTLER
Rhinoceroses worldwide are under siege as their habitat shrinks and poachers slaughter hundreds annually for their valuable horns. Now, in Indonesia, conservation groups are engaged in a desperate struggle to save the last 40 Javan rhinos on earth. READ MORE

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Insurance Companies Face Increased Risks from Warming

by BEN SCHILLER
If the damages related to climate change mount in the coming decades, insurance companies may face the prospect of paying larger disaster claims and being dragged into global warming lawsuits. But many firms, especially in the U.S., have barely begun to confront the risks. READ MORE

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Hopes Fade for Cleanup In Nigeria’s Oil-Rich Delta

by FRED PEARCE
The Ogoniland region of Nigeria has long been badly polluted by decades of oil production that has fouled the delta and contaminated drinking water. A United Nations report has recommended a massive recovery initiative, but so far the Nigerian government has shown few signs it will agree to the cleanup project. READ MORE

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Betting on Technology to Help Turn Consumers Green

by MARC GUNTHER
U.S. consumers tell researchers they want to buy environmentally friendly products, but so far they haven’t been doing that on a large scale. Now a host of companies and nonprofits are trying to use new technology — from smartphones to social networking — to make it easier for buyers to make the green choice. READ MORE

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U.S. Fossil Fuel Boom Dims Glow of Clean Energy

by KEITH SCHNEIDER
A surge in gas and oil drilling in the U.S. is helping drive the economic recovery and is enhancing energy security. But as the situation in Ohio shows, cheaper energy prices and the focus on fossil fuels has been bad news for the renewable energy industry. READ MORE

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Can Reforming the Farm Bill Help Change U.S. Agriculture?

by JIM ROBBINS
For decades, farm bills in the U.S. Congress have supported large-scale agriculture. But with the 2012 Farm Bill now up for debate, advocates say seismic shifts in the way the nation views food production may lead to new policies that tilt more toward local, sustainable agriculture. READ MORE

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Scientists Warn of Low-Dose Risks of Chemical Exposure

by ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
A new study finds that even low doses of hormone-disrupting chemicals — used in everything from plastics to pesticides – can have serious effects on human health. These findings, the researchers say, point to the need for basic changes in how chemical safety testing is conducted. READ MORE

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Digital Defenders: Tribal People Use GPS to Protect Their Lands

by FRED PEARCE
From the rainforests of central Africa to the Australian outback, indigenous people armed with GPS devices are surveying their territories and producing maps they can use to protect them from logging and other outside development. READ MORE

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California Takes the Lead With New Green Initiatives

by MARK HERTSGAARD
Long ahead of the rest of the U.S. on environmental policy, California is taking bold steps to tackle climate change — from committing to dramatic reductions in emissions, to establishing a cap-and-trade system, to mandating an increase in zero-emission vehicles. The bottom line, say state officials, is to foster an economy where sustainability is profitable. READ MORE

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How a Gold Mining Boom is Killing the Children of Nigeria

by ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
It is a pattern seen in various parts of the world — children being sickened from exposure to lead from mining activities. But the scale of the problem in Nigeria’s gold-mining region of Zamfara is unprecedented: More than 400 children have died and thousands more have been severely poisoned by exposure to lead dust. READ MORE

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As Arctic Sea Ice Declines, Polar Bear Patrol Gets Busy

by ED STRUZIK
Polar bears have long come ashore in Churchill, Manitoba, the self-styled ‘Polar Bear Capital of the World.’ But as summer sea ice steadily disappears in Hudson Bay, bears are being marooned on land for longer periods of time — and that is generating a lot of work for the Polar Bear Alert Team. READ MORE

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Can Smarter Growth Guide China’s Urban Building Boom?

by DAVID BIELLO
The world has never seen anything like China’s dizzying urbanization boom, which has taken a heavy environmental toll. But efforts are now underway to start using principles of green design and smart growth to guide the nation’s future development. READ MORE

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In Fast-Track Technology, Hope For a Second Green Revolution

by RICHARD CONNIFF
With advances in a technique known as fast-track breeding, researchers are developing crops that can produce more and healthier food and can adapt and thrive as the climate shifts. READ MORE

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A Vast Canadian Wilderness Poised for a Uranium Boom

by ED STRUZIK
Canada’s Nunavut Territory is the largest undisturbed wilderness in the Northern Hemisphere. It also contains large deposits of uranium, generating intense interest from mining companies and raising concerns that a mining boom could harm the caribou at the center of Inuit life. READ MORE

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For the Electric Car, A Slow Road to Success

by JIM MOTAVALLI
The big electric car launches of 2011 failed to generate the consumer excitement that some had predicted. But as new battery technologies emerge and tougher mileage standards kick in, automakers and analysts still believe that electric vehicles have a bright future. READ MORE

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Building a Better Bulb: Lighting Revolution Advances

by DAVE LEVITAN
With the industry’s support and despite political opposition, new U.S. lighting efficiency standards went into effect this month. This move, along with similar actions in Europe and China, is helping spur new technologies that will change the way the world's homes and businesses are illuminated. READ MORE

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Florida Counties Band Together To Ready for Warming’s Effects

by MICHAEL D. LEMONICK
While U.S. action on climate change remains stalled, four south Florida counties have joined forces to plan for how to deal with the impacts — some of which are already being felt — of rising seas, higher temperatures, and more torrential rains. READ MORE

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As Fukushima Cleanup Begins, Long-term Impacts are Weighed

by WINIFRED BIRD
The Japanese government is launching a large-scale cleanup of the fields, forests, and villages contaminated by the Fukushima nuclear disaster. But some experts caution that an overly aggressive remediation program could create a host of other environmental problems. READ MORE

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What Rising Temperatures May Mean for World’s Wine Industry

by JOHN MCQUAID
Warming temperatures associated with climate change are already affecting vineyards from France to Chile, often in beneficial ways. But as the world continues to warm, some traditional winemaking regions are scrambling to adapt, while other areas see themselves as new wine frontiers. READ MORE

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Can ‘Climate-Smart’ Agriculture Help Both Africa and the Planet?

by FRED PEARCE
One idea promoted at the Durban talks was “climate-smart agriculture," which could make crops less vulnerable to heat and drought and turn depleted soils into carbon sinks. The World Bank and African leaders are backing this new approach, but some critics are skeptical that it will benefit small-scale African farmers. READ MORE

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Camera Traps Emerge as Key Tool in Wildlife Research

by JEREMY HANCE
Scientists and conservationists are increasingly relying on heat- and motion-activated camera traps to study rare or reclusive species in remote habitats. And the striking images they provide are proving to be a boon for raising conservation awareness worldwide. READ MORE

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Sweden’s Green Veneer Hides Unsustainable Logging Practices

by ERIK HOFFNER
Sweden has a reputation as being one of the world’s most environmentally progressive nations. But its surprisingly lax forestry laws often leave decisions about logging to the timber companies — and as a result, large swaths of biologically-rich boreal forest are being lost. READ MORE

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Northwest Oyster Die-offs Show Ocean Acidification Has Arrived

by ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
The acidification of the world’s oceans from an excess of CO2 has already begun, as evidenced recently by the widespread mortality of oyster larvae in the Pacific Northwest. Scientists say this is just a harbinger of things to come if greenhouse gas emissions continue to soar. READ MORE

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Military Bases Provide Unlikely Refuge For South’s Longleaf Pine

by BRUCE DORMINEY
The expanses of longleaf pine forest that once covered the southeastern United States have been whittled away to just 3 percent of their original range. But as scientists are discovering, this threatened forest ecosystem has found a sanctuary in an unexpected place — U.S. military installations. READ MORE

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Building Retrofits: Tapping The Energy-Saving Potential

by DAVID BIELLO
No more cost-effective way to make major cuts in energy use and greenhouse gas emissions exists than retrofitting buildings. Now, from New York to Mumbai to Melbourne, a push is on to overhaul older buildings to make them more energy efficient. READ MORE

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Can Vulnerable Species Outrun Climate Change?

by EMMA MARRIS
Recent studies shed light on the key question of whether certain species, including slow-moving amphibians, can move swiftly enough to new territories as their old habitats warm. The challenges are formidable, especially if human-caused warming continues at such a rapid rate. READ MORE

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Killing Wolves: A Product of Alberta’s Big Oil and Gas Boom

by ED STRUZIK
The development of the tar sands and other oil and gas fields in Alberta has carved up the Canadian province's boreal forest, threatening herds of woodland caribou. But rather than protect caribou habitat, officials have taken a controversial step: the large-scale killing of the wolves that prey on the caribou. READ MORE

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A Rise in Fungal Diseases is Taking Growing Toll on Wildlife

by MICHELLE NIJHUIS
In an increasingly interconnected world, fungal diseases are spreading at an alarming rate and have led to deadly outbreaks in amphibian, bat, and bee populations. And in the last decade, researchers note, some of the most virulent strains have infected people. READ MORE

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A Once-Polluted Chinese City Is Turning from Gray to Green

by CHRISTINA LARSON
Shenyang — once a key in Mao Zedong’s push to industrialize China — has begun to emerge from its smoggy past, cleaning up its factories and expanding its green spaces. In doing so, this city of 8 million people has been in the forefront of a growing environmental consciousness in urban China. READ MORE

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Can Wildlife Corridors Heal Fragmented Landscapes?

by JIM ROBBINS
Conservationists have long called for creating ecological corridors that would enable large mammals and other wildlife to roam more freely across an increasingly developed planet. But now scientists are taking a closer look at just how well these corridors are working and what role they might play in a warming world. READ MORE

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A Revolutionary Technology is Unlocking Secrets of the Forest

by RHETT BUTLER
A new imaging system that uses a suite of airborne sensors is capable of providing detailed, three-dimensional pictures of tropical forests — including the species they contain and the amount of CO2 they store — at astonishing speed. These advances could play a key role in preserving the world’s beleaguered rainforests. READ MORE

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Are Flame Retardants Safe? Growing Evidence Says ‘No’

by ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
New studies have underscored the potentially harmful health effects of the most widely used flame retardants, found in everything from baby blankets to carpets. Health experts are now calling for more aggressive action to limit these chemicals, including cutting back on highly flammable, petroleum-based materials used in many consumer products. READ MORE

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The Big Payback from Bringing Back Peat Bogs

by FRED PEARCE
The draining and burning of peat bogs is a major global source of CO2 emissions. Now, a pilot project in Russia — where wildfires burned vast areas of dried-out bogs last summer — is looking to re-flood and restore tens of thousands of acres to their natural state. READ MORE

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A Huge Oil Palm Plantation Puts African Rainforest at Risk

by RHETT BUTLER AND JEREMY HANCE
As global agricultural companies turn to Africa, a U.S. firm is planning a massive oil palm plantation in Cameroon that it says will benefit local villagers. But critics argue that the project would destroy some of the key remaining forests in the West African nation and threaten species-rich reserves. READ MORE

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Saving Ancient Walnut Forests In the Valleys of Central Asia

by MIKE IVES
The former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan is home to some of the world’s largest remaining forests of walnut and wild fruit trees. In an effort to sustainably manage this global resource, an international project has focused on ending Soviet-style management and giving power — and a profit incentive — to local farmers. READ MORE

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In Berlin, Bringing Bees Back to the Heart of the City

by CHRISTIAN SCHWäGERL
In Germany’s capital — and in cities as diverse as Hong Kong and Chicago — raising bees on rooftops and in small gardens has become increasingly popular, as urban beekeepers find they can reconnect with nature and maybe even make a profit. READ MORE

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Climate Relicts: Seeking Clues On How Some Species Survive

by CARL ZIMMER
In pockets ranging from mountain peaks to bogs, scientists are discovering plants and animals that survived previous eras of climate change. Now, conservation biologists say, these climate “relicts” could shed light on how some species may hang on in the coming centuries. READ MORE

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A Solar Panel on Every Roof? In U.S., Still a Distant Dream

by DAVE LEVITAN
Daunted by high up-front costs, U.S. homeowners continue to shy away from residential solar power systems, even as utility-scale solar projects are taking off. But with do-it-yourself kits and other innovative installation approaches now on the market, residential solar is having modest growth.  READ MORE

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China’s Nuclear Power Plans Unfazed by Fukushima Disaster

by DAVID BIELLO
In the wake of the Fukushima meltdowns, some nations are looking to move away from nuclear power. But not China, which is proceeding with plans to build 36 reactors over the next decade. Now some experts are questioning whether China can safely operate a host of nuclear plants. READ MORE

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In Arid South African Lands, Fracking Controversy Emerges

by TODD PITOCK
The contentious practice of hydrofracking to extract underground natural gas has now made its way to South Africa’s Karoo, a semi-desert known for its stark beauty and indigenous plants. But opposition is growing amid concern that fracking will deplete and pollute the area’s scarce water supplies. READ MORE

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On Lake Taihu, China Moves To Battle Massive Algae Blooms

by RICHARD STONE
For two decades, the once-scenic Lake Taihu in eastern China has been choked with devastating algae blooms that have threatened drinking water for millions. Now, in a move that could provide lessons for other huge lakes worldwide, China is taking steps to restore Taihu’s ecological balance. READ MORE

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Tapping Social Media’s Potential To Muster a Vast Green Army

by CAROLINE FRASER
A rapidly expanding universe of citizens’ groups, researchers, and environmental organizations are making use of social media and smart phone applications to document changes in the natural world and to mobilize support for taking action. READ MORE

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Phosphate: A Critical Resource Misused and Now Running Low

by FRED PEARCE
Phosphate has been essential to feeding the world since the Green Revolution, but its excessive use as a fertilizer has led to widespread pollution and eutrophication. Now, many of the world’s remaining reserves are starting to be depleted. READ MORE

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As Alberta’s Tar Sands Boom, Foes Target Project’s Lifelines

by JIM ROBBINS
Exploiting North America’s largest oil deposit has destroyed vast stretches of Canada's boreal forest, arousing the ire of those opposed to this massive development of fossil fuels. Now those opponents are battling the Keystone XL pipeline, which would pass through environmentally sensitive Western lands as it moves the oil to market. READ MORE

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Green Activists Feel Sting of Chinese Government Crackdown

by CHRISTINA LARSON
Even before this spring’s ominous clampdown on China’s public-interest lawyers, writers, and activists, the country’s fledgling environmental community felt the authorities’ noose tightening. READ MORE

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Brown to Green: A New Use For Blighted Industrial Sites

by DAVE LEVITAN
Few places in the U.S. are as well suited to developing renewable energy as the contaminated sites known as “brownfields.” But as communities from Philadelphia to California are discovering, government support is critical to enable solar and wind entrepreneurs to make use of these abandoned lands. READ MORE

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Toxics in the ‘Clean Rooms’: Are Samsung Workers at Risk?

by ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
Workers groups in South Korea report an unusually high incidence of cancers and other serious diseases among employees at Samsung’s semiconductor and other electronics plants. While the company denies any link, the pattern of illnesses is disturbingly similar to that seen at semiconductor facilities in the U.S. and Europe. READ MORE

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As Arctic Sea Ice Retreats, Storms Take Toll on the Land

by ED STRUZIK
For millennia, the blanket of ice covering the Arctic Ocean protected the shore from damaging storms. But as that ice buffer disappears, increasingly powerful storm surges are eroding the coastline and sending walls of seawater inland, devastating Arctic ecosystems that support abundant wildlife. READ MORE

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By Barcoding Trees, Liberia Looks to Save its Rainforests

by FRED PEARCE
A decade after a brutal civil war, the West African nation of Liberia has partnered with the European Union on a novel system for protecting its remaining forests — marking every harvestable tree so it can be traced to its final destination. But given Liberia’s history of conflict and corruption, will it work? READ MORE

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Using CO2 to Make Fuel: A Long Shot for Green Energy

by DAVID BIELLO
What if the ever-increasing amounts of carbon dioxide that are heating up the atmosphere could be used to produce an abundant supply of liquid fuels? The U.S. government and private labs are pursuing that Holy Grail of renewable energy — but for now the cost of large-scale production is prohibitive. READ MORE

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From the Fields to Inner City, Pesticides Affect Children’s IQ

by ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
Scientists studying the effects of prenatal exposure to pesticides on the cognitive abilities of children have come to a troubling conclusion: Whether pregnant mothers are exposed to organophosphate pesticides in California fields or New York apartments, the chemicals appear to impair their children’s mental abilities. READ MORE

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An African Success: In Namibia, The People and Wildlife Coexist

by RICHARD CONNIFF
Shortly after gaining independence in 1990, Namibia turned ownership of its wildlife back to the people. By using a system of community-based management, this southern African nation has avoided the fate of most others on the continent and registered a sharp increase in its key wildlife populations. READ MORE

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Germany’s Unlikely Champion Of a Radical Green Energy Path

by CHRISTIAN SCHWäGERL
The disaster at the Fukushima plant in Japan convinced German Chancellor Angela Merkel that nuclear power would never again be a viable option for her country. Now Merkel has embarked on the world’s most ambitious plan to power an industrial economy on renewable sources of energy. READ MORE

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Europe’s CO2 Trading Scheme: Is It Time for a Major Overhaul?

by BEN SCHILLER
Now in its seventh year, the EU’s carbon emissions trading system is the only international program designed to use market mechanisms to control CO2 emissions. But critics contend it has done little to slow the release of CO2 and argue that it should be significantly reformed — or scrapped. READ MORE

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The Cerrado: Brazil’s Other Biodiverse Region Loses Ground

by FRED PEARCE
While Brazil touts its efforts to slow destruction of the Amazon, another biodiverse region of the country is being cleared for large-scale farming. But unlike the heralded rainforest it borders, the loss of the cerrado and its rich tropical savanna so far has failed to attract much notice. READ MORE

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Radioactivity in the Ocean: Diluted, But Far from Harmless

by ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
With contaminated water from Japan’s crippled Fukushima nuclear complex continuing to pour into the Pacific, scientists are concerned about how that radioactivity might affect marine life. Although the ocean’s capacity to dilute radiation is huge, signs are that nuclear isotopes are already moving up the local food chain. READ MORE

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Along Scar from Iron Curtain, A Green Belt Rises in Germany

by CHRISTIAN SCHWäGERL
A forbidding, 870-mile network of fences and guard towers once ran the length of Germany, separating East and West. Now, one of the world’s most unique nature reserves is being created along the old “Death Strip,” turning a monument to repression into a symbol of renewal. READ MORE

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As Larger Animals Decline, Forests Feel Their Absence

by SHARON LEVY
With giant tortoises, elephants, and other fruit-eating animals disappearing from many of the world’s tropical woodlands, forests are suffering from the loss of a key function performed by these creatures: the dispersal of tree seeds. But a new experiment shows that introduced species may be able to fulfill this vital ecological role. READ MORE

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In Aeolus Cave, A Search for the Vanishing Bats of the Northeast

by ELIZABETH KOLBERT
When wildlife biologists ventured into a Vermont cave this month, they found disturbing evidence that white-nose syndrome was continuing to take its toll on once-abundant bat populations. But the question remains: What can be done to halt the spread of this still-mysterious ailment? READ MORE

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Japan’s Once-Powerful Nuclear Industry is Under Siege

by CAROLINE FRASER
The disaster at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant has highlighted the importance of nuclear energy to Japan and the power long wielded by the nuclear sector. But that influence now is sure to wane, to the relief of opponents who have fought for years to check nuclear's rapid growth. READ MORE

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Agribusiness Boom Threatens Key African Wildlife Migration

by FRED PEARCE
The Ethiopian region of Gambella is home to Africa’s second-largest mammal migration, with more than a million endangered antelope and other animals moving through its grasslands. But the government has now leased vast tracts to foreign agribusinesses who are planning huge farms on land designated a national park. READ MORE

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‘Fracking’ Comes to Europe, Sparking Rising Controversy

by BEN SCHILLER
As concerns grow in the U.S. about the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” to extract natural gas from shale, companies have set their sights on Europe and its abundant reserves of this “unconventional” gas. But from Britain to Poland, critics warn of the potentially high environmental cost of this looming energy boom. READ MORE

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Alien Species Reconsidered: Finding a Value in Non-Natives

by CARL ZIMMER
One of the tenets of conservation management holds that alien species are ecologically harmful. But a new study is pointing to research that demonstrates that some non-native plants and animals can have beneficial impacts. READ MORE

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Climate’s Strong Fingerprint In Global Cholera Outbreaks

by SONIA SHAH
For decades, deadly outbreaks of cholera were attributed to the spread of disease through poor sanitation. But recent research demonstrates how closely cholera is tied to environmental and hydrological factors and to weather patterns — all of which may lead to more frequent cholera outbreaks as the world warms. READ MORE

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Arctic Roamers: The Move of Southern Species into Far North

by ED STRUZIK
Grizzly bears mating with polar bears. Red foxes out-competing Arctic foxes. Exotic diseases making their way into once-isolated polar realms. These are just some of the worrisome phenomena now occurring as Arctic temperatures soar and the Arctic Ocean, a once-impermeable barrier, melts. READ MORE

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Growth of Wood Biomass Power Stokes Concern on Emissions

by DAVE LEVITAN
Across the U.S., companies are planning scores of projects to burn trees and wood waste to produce electricity, claiming such biomass plants can be carbon-neutral. But critics contend that combusting wood is not really a form of green energy and are urging a go-slow approach until clear guidelines can be established. READ MORE

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Africa’s Flourishing Niger Delta Threatened by Libya Water Plan

by FRED PEARCE
The inland Niger delta of Mali is a unique wetland ecosystem that supports a million farmers, fishermen, and herders and a rich diversity of wildlife. But now, the country’s president and Libyan leader Moammar Gaddafi have begun a major agricultural project that will divert much of the river’s water and put the delta’s future at risk. READ MORE

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In Novel Approach to Fisheries, Fishermen Manage the Catch

by BRUCE BARCOTT
An increasingly productive way of restoring fisheries is based on the counter-intuitive concept of allowing fishermen to take charge of their own catch. But the success of this growing movement depends heavily on a strong leader who will look out not only for the fishermen, but for the resource itself. READ MORE

Report

Green Energy’s Big Challenge: The Daunting Task of Scaling Up

by DAVID BIELLO
To shift the global economy from fossil fuels to renewable energy will require the construction of wind, solar, nuclear, and other installations on a vast scale, significantly altering the face of the planet. Can these new forms of energy approach the scale needed to meet the world’s energy demands? READ MORE

Report

Massive Outbreak of Jellyfish Could Spell Trouble for Fisheries

by RICHARD STONE
The world’s oceans have been experiencing enormous blooms of jellyfish, apparently caused by overfishing, declining water quality, and rising sea temperatures. Now, scientists are trying to determine if these outbreaks could represent a “new normal” in which jellyfish increasingly supplant fish. READ MORE

Report

Threat of Mercury Poisoning Rises With Gold Mining Boom

by SHEFA SIEGEL
With high gold prices fueling a global gold rush, millions of people in the developing world are turning to small-scale gold mining. In many countries, including Colombia, miners are putting themselves and those who live nearby at risk by using highly toxic mercury in the refining process. READ MORE

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In China, a New Transparency On Government Pollution Data

by CHRISTINA LARSON
The Chinese government has begun to make environmental records available to the public, empowering green groups and citizens as they try to force factories — and the Western companies they supply — to comply with the law. READ MORE

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‘Perverse’ Carbon Payments Send Flood of Money to China

by MARK SCHAPIRO
To offset their own carbon emissions, European companies have been overpaying China to incinerate a powerful greenhouse gas known as hfc 23. And in a bizarre twist, those payments have spurred the manufacture of a harmful refrigerant that is being smuggled into the U.S. and used illegally. READ MORE

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Refilling the Carbon Sink: Biochar’s Potential and Pitfalls

by DAVE LEVITAN
The idea of creating biochar by burning organic waste in oxygen-free chambers — and then burying it — is being touted as a way to cool the planet. But while it already is being produced on a small scale, biochar’s proponents and detractors are sharply divided over whether it can help slow global warming. READ MORE

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Green Roofs are Starting To Sprout in American Cities

by BRUCE STUTZ
Long a proven technology in Europe, green roofs are becoming increasingly common in U.S. cities, with major initiatives in Chicago, Portland, and Washington, D.C. While initially more expensive than standard coverings, green roofs offer some major environmental — and economic — benefits. READ MORE

Report

The Warming of Antarctica: A Citadel of Ice Begins to Melt

by FEN MONTAIGNE
The fringes of the coldest continent are starting to feel the heat, with the northern Antarctic Peninsula warming faster than virtually any place on Earth. These rapidly rising temperatures represent the first breach in the enormous frozen dome that holds 90 percent of the world’s ice. READ MORE

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Green Tech Sector Advances Despite Failure of Climate Bill

by JOHN CAREY
While the collapse of climate legislation in Congress was a setback for some green businesses, many others are moving ahead with projects to develop renewable energy. One major reason: The clean-tech sector is rapidly growing worldwide, and U.S. companies don’t want to be left behind. READ MORE

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With Tigers Near Extinction, A Last-Ditch Strategy Emerges

by CAROLINE FRASER
In the past century, populations of wild tigers have plummeted from 100,000 to 3,500. Now the World Bank and conservationists have launched an eleventh-hour effort to save this great predator, focusing on reining in the black market for tiger parts and ending the destruction of tiger habitat. READ MORE

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China Turns to Biogas to Ease Impact of Factory Farms

by ELIZA BARCLAY
In China, millions of tons of waste from livestock farms are causing severe water pollution and massive emissions of methane. Now, some large livestock operators are turning to biogas fuel production in hopes of creating “ecological” factory farms. READ MORE

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In War-Scarred Landscape, Vietnam Replants Its Forests

by MIKE IVES
With large swaths of forest destroyed by wartime defoliants, and even larger areas lost to post-war logging, Vietnam has set an ambitious goal for regenerating its woodlands. But proponents of reintroducing native tree species face resistance from a timber industry that favors fast-growing exotics like acacia. READ MORE

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Hatch-22: The Problem with The Pacific Salmon Resurgence

by BRUCE BARCOTT
The number of salmon in the Pacific Ocean is twice what it was 50 years ago. But there is a downside to this bounty, as growing numbers of hatchery-produced salmon are flooding the Pacific and making it hard for threatened wild salmon species to find enough food to survive. READ MORE

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China Takes First Steps In the Fight Against Acid Rain

by CHRISTINA LARSON
Amid China’s seemingly boundless emissions of industrial pollutants, there are signs of hope. Discharges of sulfur dioxide, which causes acid rain, have actually decreased, offering some evidence that China is starting to establish a culture of pollution monitoring and control. READ MORE

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Rising Hopes that Electric Cars Can Play a Key Role on the Grid

by DAVE LEVITAN
Will electric cars one day become part of a network of rechargeable batteries that can help smooth out the intermittent nature of wind and solar power? Many experts believe so, pointing to programs in Europe and the U.S. that demonstrate the promise of vehicle-to-grid technology. READ MORE

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The Promise of Fusion: Energy Miracle or Mirage?

by ALEX SALKEVER
The U.S. has invested billions of dollars trying to create a controlled form of nuclear fusion that could be the energy source for an endless supply of electricity. But as a federal laboratory prepares for a key test, major questions remain about pulling off this long-dreamed-of technological feat. READ MORE

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A Troubling Decline in the Caribou Herds of the Arctic

by ED STRUZIK
Across the Far North, populations of caribou — an indispensable source of food and clothing for indigenous people — are in steep decline. Scientists point to rising temperatures and a resource-development boom as the prime culprits. READ MORE

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New Hope for Pavlovsk Station And Russia’s Rare Plant Reserve

by FRED PEARCE
In the early 20th century, Russian botanist Nikolai Vavilov created a preserve outside St. Petersburg that today contains one of the world’s largest collections of rare seeds and crops. Now, scientists and conservationists are waging an international campaign to save the reserve’s fields from being bulldozed for housing development. READ MORE

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In Scotland’s Search for Roots, A Push to Restore Wild Lands

by CAROLINE FRASER
As Scotland asserts its identity and its autonomy, environmentalists are working to restore its denuded landscape – planting native forests, creating wildlife corridors, and reintroducing species that were wiped out centuries ago. READ MORE

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Deep in Ecuador’s Rainforest, A Plan to Forego an Oil Bonanza

by KELLY HEARN
Ecuador's Yasuni National Park is one of the most biodiverse places on Earth and is home to remote Indian tribes. It also sits atop a billion barrels of oil. Now, Ecuador and the United Nations are forging an ambitious plan to walk away from drilling in the park in exchange for payments from the international community. READ MORE

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A Steady, Steep Decline for The Lowly, Uncharismatic Eel

by JAMES PROSEK
The freshwater eel, which spawns in the middle of the ocean, was once abundant in much of the world. But the proliferation of dams, coastal development, and overfishing have drastically reduced eel populations, with few defenders coming to the aid of these fascinating — though still not fully understood — creatures. READ MORE

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Spurred by Warming World, Beetles Threaten Coffee Crops

by ERICA WESTLY
Coffee production has long been vulnerable to drought or excess rains. But recently, a tiny insect that thrives in warmer temperatures — the coffee berry borer — has been spreading steadily, devastating coffee plants in Africa, Latin America, and around the world. READ MORE

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On China’s Beleaguered Yangtze, A Push to Save Surviving Species

by RICHARD STONE
The Yangtze has been carved up by dams, used as an open sewer, and subjected to decades of overfishing. Now, Chinese scientists — alarmed by the disappearance of the Yangtze river dolphin and other creatures — are calling for a 10-year moratorium on fishing in the world’s third-longest river. READ MORE

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The Legacy of the Gulf Spill: What to Expect for the Future?

by JOHN MCQUAID
The Gulf of Mexico’s capacity to recover from previous environmental assaults — especially the 1979 Ixtoc explosion — provides encouragement about the prospects for its post-Deepwater future. But scientists remain worried about the BP spill's long-term effects on the health of the Gulf and its sea life. READ MORE

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Are Cell Phones Safe? The Verdict is Still Out

by BRUCE STUTZ
While some studies have suggested that frequent use of cell phones causes increased risk of brain and mouth cancers, others have found no such links. But since cell phones are relatively new and brain cancers grow slowly, many experts are now recommending taking steps to reduce exposure. READ MORE

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Growing Shortages of Water Threaten China’s Development

by CHRISTINA LARSON
With 20 percent of the world’s population but just 7 percent of its available freshwater, China faces serious water shortages as its economy booms and urbanization increases. The government is planning massive water diversion projects, but environmentalists say conservation — especially in the wasteful agricultural sector — is the key. READ MORE

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Enlisting Endangered Species As a Tool to Combat Warming

by TODD WOODY
Environmentalists in the U.S. are increasingly trying to use the Endangered Species Act to ease the impact of global warming on numerous animals and plants, including the American pika. The goal is not only to protect the habitat of at-risk species but also to force reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. READ MORE

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Does Egypt Own The Nile? A Battle Over Precious Water

by FRED PEARCE
A dispute between Egypt and upstream African nations has brought to the fore a long-standing controversy over who has rights to the waters of the Nile. The outcome could have profound consequences for the ecological health of the river and for one of the world’s largest tropical wetlands. READ MORE

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Tracking the Himalaya’s Melting Glaciers

by DAVID BREASHEARS
Unearthing photographs of the Himalaya dating back more than a century, mountaineer and filmmaker David Breashears has assembled a powerful visual record of the rapid retreat of the region’s glaciers. By comparing archival photographs from such renowned explorers as George Mallory to photographs taken in the past three years, Breashears has documented the steady disappearance of these great rivers of ice, whose melting will eventually threaten the water supplies of hundreds of millions of people across Asia. READ MORE

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With a Boost from Innovation, Small Wind Is Powering Ahead

by ALEX SALKEVER
New technologies, feed-in tariffs, and tax credits are helping propel the small wind industry, especially in the United States. Once found mostly in rural areas, small wind installations are now starting to pop up on urban rooftops. READ MORE

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High Above the Earth, Satellites Track Melting Ice

by MICHAEL D. LEMONICK
The surest sign of a warming Earth is the steady melting of its ice zones, from disappearing sea ice in the Arctic to shrinking glaciers worldwide. Now, scientists are using increasingly sophisticated satellite technology to measure the extent, thickness, and height of ice, assembling an essential picture of a planet in transition. READ MORE

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The Nuclear Power Resurgence: How Safe Are the New Reactors?

by SUSAN Q. STRANAHAN
As utilities seek to build new nuclear power plants in the U.S. and around the world, the latest generation of reactors feature improvements over older technologies. But even as attention focuses on nuclear as an alternative to fossil fuels, questions remain about whether the newer reactors are sufficiently foolproof to be adopted on a large scale. READ MORE

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Energy Sleuths in Pursuit Of the Truly Green Building

by RICHARD CONNIFF
The practice of “commissioning,” in which an engineer monitors the efficiency of a building from its design through its initial operation, just may be the most effective strategy for reducing long-term energy usage, costs, and greenhouse gas emissions from buildings. So why is it so seldom used? READ MORE

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Companies Put Restrictions On Research into GM Crops

by BRUCE STUTZ
A battle is quietly being waged between the industry that produces genetically modified seeds and scientists trying to investigate the environmental impacts of engineered crops. Although companies such as Monsanto have recently given ground, researchers say these firms are still loath to allow independent analyses of their patented — and profitable — seeds. READ MORE

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Under Threat in the Gulf, A Refuge Created by Roosevelt

by DOUGLAS BRINKLEY
Among the natural treasures at risk from the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the Breton National Wildlife Refuge, created by Theodore Roosevelt to halt a grave threat to birds in his era — the lucrative trade in plumage. Now, oil from the BP spill is starting to wash up on beaches where Roosevelt once walked. READ MORE

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Turning to Greener Weapons In the Battle Against Malaria

by SONIA SHAH
Insecticides such as DDT have long been used to combat the scourge of malaria in the developing world. But with the disease parasite becoming increasingly adept at resisting the chemical onslaught, some countries are achieving striking success by eliminating the environmental conditions that give rise to malarial mosquitoes. READ MORE

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The Greening of Silicon Valley: It Looks Like the Next Big Thing

by TODD WOODY
California’s high-tech giants have long used renewable energy to help power their Silicon Valley headquarters. Now, companies such as Google, Adobe Systems, and eBay are preparing for the next step — investing in off-site solar and wind installations and innovative technologies that will supply their offices and data centers with green electricity. READ MORE

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As Pharmaceutical Use Soars, Drugs Taint Water and Wildlife

by SONIA SHAH
With nearly $800 billion in drugs sold worldwide, pharmaceuticals are increasingly being released into the environment. The “green pharmacy” movement seeks to reduce the ecological impact of these drugs, which have caused mass bird die-offs and spawned antibiotic-resistant pathogens. READ MORE

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A Controversial Drilling Practice Hits Roadblock in New York

by BRUCE STUTZ
Hydro fracturing is a profitable method of natural gas extraction that uses large quantities of water and chemicals to free gas from underground rock formations. But New York City’s concerns that the practice would threaten its water supply have slowed a juggernaut that has been sweeping across parts of the northeastern United States. READ MORE

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As China’s Pollution Toll Grows, Protesters and Media Push Back

by FRED PEARCE
In recent months, protests over the severe illnesses caused by China's heavy industries have resulted in a crackdown on polluters. Leading the charge has been the state-run media, which the central government is now using to gain control over corrupt local authorities and powerful commercial enterprises. READ MORE

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What’s Killing the Great Forests of the American West?

by JIM ROBBINS
Across western North America, huge tracts of forest are dying off at an extraordinary rate, mostly because of outbreaks of insects. Scientists are now seeing such forest die-offs around the world and are linking them to changes in climate.   READ MORE

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World’s Pall of Black Carbon Can Be Eased With New Stoves

by JON R. LUOMA
Two billion people worldwide do their cooking on open fires, producing sooty pollution that shortens millions of lives and exacerbates global warming. If widely adopted, a new generation of inexpensive, durable cook stoves could go a long way toward alleviating this problem. READ MORE

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In India, a Clear Victor on The Climate Action Front

by ISABEL HILTON
In the internal struggle over the nation’s climate policy, India’s charismatic Environment Minister Jairam Ramesh has triumphed and is pushing his country toward low-carbon policies both at home and internationally. READ MORE

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CO2 Capture and Storage Gains a Growing Foothold

by DAVID BIELLO
The drive to extract and store CO2 from coal-fired power plants is gaining momentum, with the Obama administration backing the technology and the world’s first capture and sequestration project now operating in the U.S. Two questions loom: Will carbon capture and storage be affordable? And will it be safe? READ MORE

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In the Mountains of the Moon, A Trek to Africa’s Last Glaciers

by TOM KNUDSON
The shrinking ice cap atop Mount Kilimanjaro is Africa’s most famous glacier. But the continent harbors other pockets of ice, most notably in the Rwenzori Mountains of western Uganda.  And as temperatures rise, the Rwenzori’s tropical glaciers — located as high as 16,500 feet — are fast disappearing. READ MORE

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It’s Green Against Green In Mojave Desert Solar Battle

by TODD WOODY
Few places are as well suited for large-scale solar projects as California’s Mojave Desert. But as mainstream environmental organizations push plans to turn the desert into a center for renewable energy, some green groups — concerned about spoiling this iconic Western landscape — are standing up to oppose them. READ MORE

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The Electric Car Revolution Will Soon Take to the Streets

by JIM MOTAVALLI
For years, the promise and hype surrounding electric cars failed to materialize. But as this year’s Detroit auto show demonstrated, major car companies and well-funded startups — fueled by federal clean-energy funding and rapid improvement in lithium-ion batteries — are now producing electric vehicles that will soon be in showrooms. READ MORE

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Arctic Tundra is Being Lost As Far North Quickly Warms

by BILL SHERWONIT
The treeless ecosystem of mosses, lichens, and berry plants is giving way to shrub land and boreal forest. As scientists study the transformation, they are discovering that major warming-related events, including fires and the collapse of slopes due to melting permafrost, are leading to the loss of tundra in the Arctic. READ MORE

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Behind Mass Die-Offs, Pesticides Lurk as Culprit

by SONIA SHAH
In the past dozen years, three new diseases have decimated populations of amphibians, honeybees, and — most recently — bats. Increasingly, scientists suspect that low-level exposure to pesticides could be contributing to this rash of epidemics. READ MORE

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Madagascar’s Political Chaos Threatens Conservation Gains

by RHETT BUTLER
Since the government's collapse after a coup last March, Madagascar's rainforests have been plundered for their precious wood and unique wildlife. But now there are a few encouraging signs, as officials promise a crackdown on illegal logging and ecotourists begin to return to the island. READ MORE

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Complete Coverage of the Copenhagen Climate Talks

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In Search of New Waters, Fish Farming Moves Offshore

by JOHN MCQUAID
As wild fish stocks continue to dwindle, aquaculture is becoming an increasingly important source of protein worldwide. Now, a growing number of entrepreneurs are raising fish in large pens in the open ocean, hoping to avoid the many environmental problems of coastal fish farms. READ MORE

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The Copenhagen Diagnosis: Sobering Update on the Science

by ELIZABETH KOLBERT
On the eve of the Copenhagen conference, a group of scientists has issued an update on the 2007 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Their conclusions? Ice at both poles is melting faster than predicted, the claims of recent global cooling are wrong, and world leaders must act fast if steep temperature rises are to be avoided. READ MORE

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Courting Controversy with a New View on Exotic Species

by GREG BREINING
A number of biologists are challenging the long-held orthodoxy that alien species are inherently bad. In their contrarian view, many introduced species have proven valuable and useful and have increased the diversity and resiliency of native ecosystems. READ MORE

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The Pursuit of New Ways to Boost Solar Development

by JON R. LUOMA
The solar power boom in Germany, Spain, and parts of the United States has been fueled by government subsidies. But now some U.S. states — led by New Jersey, of all places — are pioneering a different approach: issuing tradable credits that can be sold on the open market. So far, the results have been promising. READ MORE

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In Japan’s Managed Landscape, a Struggle to Save the Bears

by WINIFRED BIRD
Although it is a heavily urbanized nation, fully two-thirds of Japan remains woodlands. Yet many of the forests are timber plantations inhospitable to wildlife, especially black bears, which are struggling to survive in one of the most densely populated countries on Earth. READ MORE

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The Spread of New Diseases and the Climate Connection

by SONIA SHAH
As humans increasingly encroach on forested lands and as temperatures rise, the transmission of disease from animals and insects to people is growing. Now a new field, known as “conservation medicine,” is exploring how ecosystem disturbance and changing interactions between wildlife and humans can lead to the spread of new pathogens. READ MORE

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Pulling CO2 from the Air: Promising Idea, Big Price Tag

by DAVID BIELLO
Of the various geoengineering schemes being proposed to cool an overheated planet, one approach — extracting carbon dioxide from the atmosphere using “artificial trees” — may have the most potential. But both questions and big hurdles remain before this emerging technology could be widely deployed. READ MORE

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Korea’s Four Rivers Project: Economic Boost or Boondoggle?

by JAMES CARD
The natural landscape of South Korea has been largely re-engineered, with nearly every river damned or forced into concrete channels. Now the government is reviving plans for a mammoth water project that would dredge and develop hundreds more miles of waterways and put added stress on the country's remaining wildlife. READ MORE

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New York City Girds Itself for Heat and Rising Seas

by BRUCE STUTZ
By the end of the century, New York’s climate could resemble that of present-day Raleigh, North Carolina and its harbor could easily rise by two feet or more. Faced with this prospect, the city is among the first urban centers to begin changing the way it builds its infrastructure — and the way it thinks about its future. READ MORE

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Solar Power from Space: Moving Beyond Science Fiction

by MICHAEL D. LEMONICK
For more than 40 years, scientists have dreamed of collecting the sun’s energy in space and beaming it back to Earth. Now, a host of technological advances, coupled with interest from the U.S. military, may be bringing that vision close to reality. READ MORE

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The Growing Specter of Africa Without Wildlife

by RICHARD CONNIFF
Recent studies show that wildlife in some African nations is declining even in national parks, as poaching increases and human settlements hem in habitat. With the continent expected to add more than a billion people by 2050, do these trends portend an Africa devoid of wild animals? READ MORE

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The Great Paradox of China: Green Energy and Black Skies

by CHRISTINA LARSON
China is on its way to becoming the world’s largest producer of renewable energy, yet it remains one of the most polluted countries on earth. A year after the Beijing Olympics, economic and political forces are combining to make China simultaneously a leader in alternative energy – and in dirty water and air. READ MORE

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Controlling the Ranching Boom that Threatens the Amazon

by RHETT BUTLER
Clearing land for cattle is responsible for 80 percent of rainforest loss in the Brazilian Amazon. But with Amazon ranching now a multi-billion dollar business, corporate buyers of beef and leather, including Wal-Mart, are starting to demand that the destruction of the forest be halted. READ MORE

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First Comes Global Warming, Then an Evolutionary Explosion

by CARL ZIMMER
In a matter of years or decades, researchers believe, animals and plants already are adapting to life in a warmer world. Some species will be unable to change quickly enough and will go extinct, but others will evolve, as natural selection enables them to carry on in an altered environment. READ MORE

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Mountaintop Mining Legacy: Destroying Appalachia’s Streams

by JOHN MCQUAID
The environmental damage caused by mountaintop removal mining across Appalachia has been well documented. But scientists are now beginning to understand that the mining operations’ most lasting damage may be caused by the massive amounts of debris dumped into valley streams. READ MORE

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Its Economy In Shambles, the Midwest Goes Green

by KEITH SCHNEIDER
It took awhile, but the U.S. Midwest finally has recognized that the industries that once powered its economy will never return.  Now leaders in the region are looking to renewable energy manufacturing and technologies as key to the heartland’s renaissance. READ MORE

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The Challenge for Green Energy: How to Store Excess Electricity

by JON R. LUOMA
For years, the stumbling block for making renewable energy practical and dependable has been how to store electricity for days when the sun isn't shining and the wind isn't blowing. But new technologies suggest this goal may finally be within reach. READ MORE

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From the Sewage Plant, the Promise of Biofuel

by GREG BREINING
Researchers throughout the world are working to produce biofuel from algae. But a few are trying a decidedly novel approach: Using an abundant and freely available source — human waste — to make the fuel of the future while also treating sewage. READ MORE

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With the Clearing of Forests, Baby Orangutans Are Marooned

by RHETT BUTLER
As Borneo's rain forests are razed for oil palm plantations, wildlife centers are taking in more and more orphaned orangutans and preparing them for reintroduction into the wild. But the endangered primates now face a new threat — there is not enough habitat where they can be returned. READ MORE

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The Damming of the Mekong: Major Blow to an Epic River

by FRED PEARCE
The Mekong has long flowed freely, supporting one of the world’s great inland fisheries. But China is now building a series of dams on the 2,800-mile river that will restrict its natural flow and threaten the sustenance of tens of millions of Southeast Asians. READ MORE

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For Greening Aviation, Are Biofuels the Right Stuff?

by DAVID BIELLO
Biofuels – made from algae and non-food plants – are emerging as a potentially viable alternative to conventional jet fuels. Although big challenges remain, the reductions in greenhouse gas emissions could be major. READ MORE

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Beyond Abstraction: Moving the Public on Climate Action

by DOUG STRUCK
Most Americans believe climate change is a serious problem but are not committed to making the hard choices needed to deal with it. Recent research begins to explain some of the reasons why. READ MORE

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Adaptation Emerges as Key Part of Any Climate Change Plan

by BRUCE STUTZ
After years of reluctance, scientists and governments are now looking to adaptation measures as critical for confronting the consequences of climate change. And increasingly, plans are being developed to deal with rising seas, water shortages, spreading diseases, and other realities of a warming world. READ MORE

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The Razing of Appalachia: Mountaintop Removal Revisited

by JOHN MCQUAID
Over the past two decades, mountaintop removal mining in Appalachia has obliterated or severely damaged more than a million acres of forest and buried more than 1,000 miles of streams. Now, the Obama administration is showing signs it plans to crack down on this destructive practice. READ MORE

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Hailed as a Miracle Biofuel, Jatropha Falls Short of Hype

by JON R. LUOMA
The scrubby jatropha tree has been touted as a wonder biofuel with unlimited potential. But questions are now emerging as to whether widespread jatropha cultivation is really feasible or whether it will simply displace badly-needed food crops in the developing world. READ MORE

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A Potential Breakthrough in Harnessing the Sun’s Energy

by DAVID BIELLO
New solar thermal technology overcomes a major challenge facing solar power – how to store the sun’s heat for use at night or on a rainy day. As researchers tout its promise, solar thermal plants are under construction or planned from Spain to Australia to the American Southwest. READ MORE

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As Climate Warms, Species May Need to Migrate or Perish

by CARL ZIMMER
With global warming pushing some animals and plants to the brink of extinction, conservation biologists are now saying that the only way to save some species may be to move them. READ MORE

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Retreat of Andean Glaciers Foretells Global Water Woes

by CAROLYN KORMANN
Bolivia accounts for a tiny fraction of global greenhouse gas emissions. But it will soon be paying a disproportionately high price for a major consequence of global warming: the rapid loss of glaciers and a subsequent decline in vital water supplies. READ MORE

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China’s Grand Plans for Eco-Cities Now Lie Abandoned

by CHRISTINA LARSON
Mostly conceived by international architects, China’s eco-cities were intended to be models of green urban design. But the planning was done with little awareness of how local people lived, and the much-touted projects have largely been scrapped. READ MORE

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Warming Takes Center Stage as Australian Drought Worsens

by KEITH SCHNEIDER
With record-setting heat waves, bush fires and drought, Australians are increasingly convinced they are facing the early impacts of global warming. Their growing concern about climate change has led to a consensus that the nation must now act boldly to stave off the crisis. READ MORE

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Satellites and Google Earth Prove Potent Conservation Tool

by RHETT BUTLER
Armed with vivid images from space and remote sensing data, scientists, environmentalists, and armchair conservationists are now tracking threats to the planet and making the information available to anyone with an Internet connection. READ MORE

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Twenty Years Later, Impacts of the Exxon Valdez Linger

by DOUG STRUCK
Two decades after the Exxon Valdez spilled 11 million gallons of crude oil into Alaska’s waters, the Prince William Sound, its fishermen, and its wildlife have still not fully recovered. READ MORE

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An Army of Lobbyists Readies for Battle on the Climate Bill

by MARIANNE LAVELLE
With carbon cap-and-trade legislation now on Washington’s agenda, companies and interest groups have been hiring lobbyists at a feverish pace. For every member of Congress, there are now four climate lobbyists, many of them hoping to derail or water down the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. READ MORE

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Finding New Species: The Golden Age of Discovery

by BRUCE STUTZ
Aided by new access to remote regions, researchers have been discovering new species at a record pace — 16,969 in 2006 alone. The challenge now is to preserve threatened ecosystems before these species, and others yet unknown, are lost. READ MORE

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Laos Emerges as Key Source in Asia’s Illicit Wildlife Trade

by RHETT BUTLER
Long an isolated land with abundant forests and biodiversity, Laos is rapidly developing as China and other Asian nations exploit its resources. One of the first casualties has been the wildlife, now being rapidly depleted by a thriving black-market trade. READ MORE

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The Dam Building Boom: Right Path to Clean Energy?

by DAVID BIELLO
Led by China, the developing world is engaged in a flurry of dam construction, touting hydropower as renewable energy in an era of global warming. But critics point out that the human and environmental costs of dams remain high. READ MORE

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The Cost of the Biofuel Boom: Destroying Indonesia’s Forests

by TOM KNUDSON
The clearing of Indonesia’s rain forest for palm oil plantations is having profound effects – threatening endangered species, upending the lives of indigenous people, and releasing massive amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. READ MORE

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U.S. Automakers Worry that Greener Cars May Not Sell

by JIM MOTAVALLI
Even as they debut the next generation of hybrids and battery-powered cars, auto company executives are not confident that the American public will buy them. READ MORE

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On Chinese Water Project, A Struggle Over Sound Science

by CHRISTINA LARSON
Geologist Yong Yang has serious concerns about plans for a massive Yangtze River diversion project. When he went public with them, he found out how difficult it can be to challenge a government decision in China. The third in a series on Chinese environmentalists. READ MORE

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Plugging in to the Electric Car Revolution

by JIM MOTAVALLI
The potential for electric vehicles has been talked about for decades. But a former Israeli software entrepreneur is developing a game-changing infrastructure that could finally make them feasible — a standardized network of charging stations where drivers can plug right in. READ MORE

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As Rain Forests Disappear, A Market Solution Emerges

by RHETT BUTLER
Despite the creation of protected areas in the Amazon and other tropical regions, rain forests worldwide are still being destroyed for a simple reason: They are worth more cut down than standing. But with deforestation now a leading driver of global warming, a movement is growing to pay nations and local people to keep their rain forests intact. READ MORE

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In China’s Mining Region, Villagers Stand Up to Pollution

by ZHOU JIGANG AND ZHU CHUHUA
After decades of living with fouled rivers and filthy air, residents of China’s Manganese Triangle are rising up and refusing to accept the intolerable conditions created by illegal mining activity. Their bold protests have shone light on the dark side of China’s economic boom. From Sichuan province, Chinese journalists Zhou Jigang and Zhu Chuhua report. READ MORE

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Capturing the Ocean’s Energy

by JON R. LUOMA
Despite daunting challenges, technology to harness the power of the waves and tides is now being deployed around the world – from Portugal to South Korea to New York’s East River. These projects, just beginning to produce electricity, are on the cutting edge of renewable energy’s latest frontier: hydrodynamic power. READ MORE

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Zimbabwe’s Desperate Miners Ravage the Land

by ANDREW MAMBONDIYANI
Hard-pressed by economic straits, illegal panners are tearing up Zimbabwe’s countryside in search of gold and diamonds. They leave behind a trail of destruction: devastated fields and forests, mud-choked rivers, and mercury-tainted water. Andrew Mambondiyani reports from eastern Zimbabwe. READ MORE

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Melting Arctic Ocean Raises Threat of ‘Methane Time Bomb’

by SUSAN Q. STRANAHAN
Scientists have long believed that thawing permafrost in Arctic soils could release huge amounts of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Now they are watching with increasing concern as methane begins to bubble up from the bottom of the fast-melting Arctic Ocean. READ MORE

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Deep Geothermal: The Untapped Renewable Energy Source

by DAVID BIELLO
Until now, geothermal technology has only been used on a small scale to produce power. But with major new projects now underway, deep geothermal systems may soon begin making a significant contribution to the world’s energy needs. READ MORE

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What’s Killing the Tasmanian Devil?

by DAVID QUAMMEN
Scientists have been trying to identify the cause of a cancer epidemic that is wiping out Australia’s Tasmanian devils. Now new research points to an alarming conclusion: because of the species’ low genetic diversity, the cancer is contagious and is spreading from one devil to another. READ MORE

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Financial Crisis Dims Chances for U.S. Climate Legislation

by MARGARET KRIZ
Environmentalists had been looking to a new president and a new Congress to pass legislation dealing with global warming next year. But with tough economic times looming, the passage of a sweeping climate change bill now appears far less likely. READ MORE

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A Corporate Approach to Rescuing the World’s Fisheries

by NICHOLAS DAY
The commitment by Wal-Mart, McDonald’s, and other major companies to buy only sustainably-caught seafood is an encouraging sign in an otherwise bleak global fisheries picture. After decades of government inaction and ineffective consumer campaigns, corporate pressure may finally be starting to turn the tide on reckless overfishing. READ MORE

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Revenge of the Electric Car

by JEFF GOODELL
After years of false starts and failures, the electric car may finally be poised to go big-time. With automakers from GM to Chrysler to Nissan preparing to roll out new plug-in hybrids or all-electric models, it looks like the transition from gasoline to electricity is now irreversible. READ MORE

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Will the Jordan River Keep on Flowing?

by GIDON BROMBERG
Massive withdrawals for irrigation, rapid population growth, and a paralyzing regional conflict have drained nearly all the water from this fabled river. A leading Israeli conservationist describes a multinational effort to save the Jordan River. READ MORE

Report

Alaska’s Pebble Mine: Fish Versus Gold

by BILL SHERWONIT
With the support of Gov. Sarah Palin, mining interests have defeated an Alaska ballot measure that could have blocked a huge proposed mining project. Now, plans are moving forward to exploit the massive gold and copper deposit at Bristol Bay, home of one of the world’s greatest salmon runs. READ MORE

Report

Solar’s Time Has Finally Arrived

by JON R. LUOMA
After years of optimistic predictions and false starts, it looks like solar's moment is here at last. Analysts say a pattern of rapid growth, technological breakthroughs, and falling production costs has put solar power on the brink of becoming the world's dominant electricity source. READ MORE

Report

China’s New Environmental Advocates

by CHRISTINA LARSON
Until recently, the idea of environmental advocacy was largely unheard of in China. But that’s changing rapidly. At a legal aid center based in Beijing, Xu Kezhu and her colleagues are helping pollution victims stand up for their rights. The second in a series on Chinese environmentalists. READ MORE

Report

The Arctic Resource Rush is On

by ED STRUZIK
As the Arctic's sea ice melts, energy and mining companies are moving into previously inaccessible regions to tap the abundant riches that lie beneath the permafrost and the ocean floor. The potential environmental impacts are troubling. READ MORE

Report

Global Commodities Boom Fuels New Assault on Amazon

by RHETT BUTLER
With soaring prices for agricultural goods and new demand for biofuels, the clearing of the world's largest rain forest has accelerated dramatically. Unless forceful measures are taken, half of the Brazilian Amazon could be cut, burned or dried out within 20 years. READ MORE

Report

The Limits of Climate Modeling

by FRED PEARCE
As the public seeks answers about the future impacts of climate change, some climatologists are growing increasingly uneasy about the localized predictions they are being asked to make. READ MORE

Report

China’s Emerging Environmental Movement

by CHRISTINA LARSON
Quietly and somewhat surprisingly, green groups are cropping up throughout China and are starting to have an impact. In the first in a series on Chinese environmentalists, journalist Christina Larson visits with Zhao Zhong, who is leading the fight to save the Yellow River. READ MORE

Report

What the Next President Must Do

by ELIZABETH KOLBERT
After years of U.S. inaction, a new president will have to move quickly to address global warming. In an e360 report, New Yorker writer Elizabeth Kolbert surveys the views of various nonpartisan groups and provides a blueprint for what needs to be done. READ MORE

Report

Russia’s Lake Baikal: Preserving a Natural Treasure

by PETER THOMSON
The world's greatest lake, holding 20 percent of the planet's surface fresh water, has long remained one of the most pristine places on earth. Now, as Russia's economy booms and its climate warms, the Siberian lake faces new threats. READ MORE

Report

DNA Technology: Discovering New Species

by JON R. LUOMA
By taking bits of a single gene, scientists are using DNA barcoding to identify new species. If a portable hand-held scanning device can be developed, one ecologist says, it could “do for biodiversity what the printing press did for literacy.” READ MORE

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