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28 Jun 2013: Global Biodiversity Maps
Show Species Health Down to Local Level

U.S. researchers have published a series of data-rich maps that identify the world’s conservation priority

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Global biodiversity map

Saving Species/Globaïa
Density of biodiversity, South America
hotspots with a level of detail they say is 100 times finer than previous assessments. Using the latest data on more than 21,000 species of mammals, amphibians, and birds, the maps produced by North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers provide a snapshot of biodiversity health at a 10-kilometer-by-10-kilometer scale, comparable to the geographic scale at which critical conservation decisions are made. The color-coded maps reveal patterns of biodiversity for the different types of species, with deep reds and yellows across South America, for example, illustrating the richest density, while shades of blue in the world’s deserts indicating less diversity. Researchers hope the information will help policymakers make best use of scarce conservation resources to protect the world’s most vulnerable species. “We have better data than in the past — and better analytical methods,” said Clinton Jenkins, a research scholar at NCSU and lead author of the paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “Now we have married them for conservation purposes.”


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