08 Aug 2013: Report

Recycling’s ‘Final Frontier’:
The Composting of Food Waste

A move by New York City to begin collecting food scraps and other organic waste is just the latest example of expanding efforts by municipalities worldwide to recycle large quantities of unused food and slash the amount of material sent to landfills.

by dave levitan

As municipal food composting programs spread across North America and Europe, no city faces a more daunting task than New York. Its Department of Sanitation collects more than 10,000 tons of trash every day, and another 1,700 tons of recyclable materials. A large portion of that waste, though, may soon have a future other than the landfill: Food scraps and other “organics” have long been just a part of New York’s trash pile, but a pilot program in the city is aimed at rolling out collection of that material and composting it, a far more environmentally friendly method.

“It’s the next new thing in terms of municipal waste handling in the 21st century,” says Eric Goldstein, a senior attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in New York. “Right now... there are over 150 communities throughout the United States that are collecting organics at curbside. It’s a national trend. It’s revolutionary.”

Many of those programs are still voluntary, and the bulk are in small cities and towns. But larger cities in North America — including San Francisco,
‘We spend over $85 million a year sending food waste to landfills,’ says a New York City official.
Seattle, San Antonio, Toronto, and Portland, Ore. — are moving rapidly ahead. And municipal composting efforts in many European countries are far advanced and steadily growing. In 2011, the 27 states in the European Union composted on average 15 percent of municipal waste, with Austria composting 34 percent, the Netherlands 28 percent, and countries like France, Spain, and Germany each composting about 18 percent.

In New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s State of the City address this past February, he called food waste the city’s “final recycling frontier,” which holds true for the rest of the United States, as well. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the country as a whole produced 250 million tons of municipal solid waste in 2011, and compostable materials — which include yard trimmings, paper and paperboard, as well as food waste — comprised the largest component of that at 56 percent.

The environmental benefits of recycling that material are significant. As it decomposes in landfills, food and other organic waste produces methane, a greenhouse gas 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. According to the EPA, landfills are the third-largest source of methane in the United States, behind industry and agriculture. Shipping waste long distances from cities to landfills produces even more greenhouse gas emissions. Composting, meanwhile, takes that waste and turns it into something usable: fertilizer. If cities like New York want to cut emissions, cut waste, and even cut costs, composting is a proven way to go about it.

The good news is that of the 87 million tons of “recovered” waste in the U.S. in 2011 — meaning waste that did not end up in a landfill — organic material accounted for the largest component. But most of that material was paper; food waste accounted for only 1.6 percent of the recovered total versus 14.5 percent of the generated total, the EPA says. The U.S. does a reasonably good job of keeping paper out of landfills thanks to recycling programs, but food almost universally still goes where it shouldn’t.

Food compost bin
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Of the 87 million tons of “recovered” waste in the U.S. in 2011, only 1.6 percent was food waste.
New York is trying to change that with its new program. So far, compost collection is being offered in one neighborhood of Staten Island, and city officials say that after only a few months participation rates are above 40 percent. Contamination rates — meaning, the presence of non-compostable material in the compost bin — are at 1 percent or below. In Manhattan, about 100 city schools are also participating, with a goal of spreading to 400 schools by the end of the year. Two high-rise apartment buildings are included as well, with more to follow this fall.

“We spend over $85 million a year sending food waste to landfills, so there’s a major cost,” said Ron Gonen, New York City’s deputy commissioner for recycling and sustainability, who heads up the composting program. He said so far the program is collecting at a pace on the order of “tens of thousands” of tons per year. “It’s growing every day,” said Gonen. “We’re going to continue to expand, in all five boroughs.” By 2014 the program will cover around 100,000 households.

Goldstein says that if New York demonstrates the economic and logistical viability of its program it could be a “bellwether” in the push to expand composting nationwide. But a few cities — in general, the green, progressive ones you might expect — have already taken the lead over the last decade. San Francisco — the second-densest large city in the U.S. after New York — is considered the frontrunner, thanks to legislation in 2002 that set a goal of diverting 75 percent of its waste from landfills by 2010 and achieving “zero waste” by 2020.

San Francisco’s composting program began with restaurants and other businesses, and in 2009 an ordinance made it mandatory for all residents to separate organic material for collection. Instead of two bins to set out on
In the European Union, 40 percent of waste is now composted or recycled.
the curb for trash and recyclables, there are now three. The green compost bins can include all food scraps, no matter how spoiled, along with vegetation from yards like leaves and flowers, and solid paper products including coffee cups, waxy paper, milk cartons, and related items. The city collected its millionth ton of organic waste for composting last fall. Overall, 78 percent of San Francisco’s waste is now diverted from landfills.

Seattle has a similar program, as does Portland; the latter went a step further and scaled back residential garbage pickup to only once every two weeks when the weekly compost pickup began.

Despite some early resistance and confusion — much of it related to every-other-week garbage collection — a survey in Portland found that 66 percent of residents rated the city’s recycling and composting program as “good” or “very good” after one year, with another 20 percent neutral on the issue. Along with the positive reception, there has been clear progress: In the 12-month period prior to the October 2011 start of the composting program, 94,100 tons of garbage were collected. In the following 12 months, that figure fell to 58,300 tons. Meanwhile, collections of compostable material rose from 30,600 tons to 85,400 tons, a figure that includes yard waste.

There were questions early on about vermin, but moving the scraps from the garbage can to the compost bin doesn’t change much, said Bruce Walker, Portland’s solid waste and recycling program manager. The organic material in Portland travels to one of two facilities that are 15 and 90 miles from downtown. Walker said regular garbage gets trucked much farther, about 140 miles from the city, so the environmental savings are compounded. The composting facilities produce fertilizers that are sold to farms, tree nurseries, and to the general public.

In Europe, the European Landfill Directive requires European Union member states to reduce “biodegradable municipal waste” sent to landfills
‘Ultimately, there’s going to be very little left in the traditional garbage can,’ says one official.
to 35 percent of 1995 amounts by 2016. In the EU, 40 percent of waste is now composted or recycled, with 23 percent incinerated and 37 percent landfilled. Norway, Sweden, the Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland, Belgium, Austria, and Germany now send less than 3 percent of their waste to landfills. Copenhagen, one of the greenest cities in the world, stopped sending organic waste to landfills as far back as 1990.

Other European countries lag far behind, with Greece and eastern European nations such as Bulgaria, Lithuania, and Romania doing almost no composting. Still, some of the swiftest progress has come from some former eastern bloc countries like Estonia. The capital city of Talinn has been collecting biodegradable kitchen waste separately since 2007, part of the reason why landfill rates in Estonia have dropped from close to 100 percent 15 years ago to below 60 percent today. Europe is also much farther along than the U.S. in using anaerobic digestion, a process that takes organic waste and turns it into biogas, which can be used to generate electricity.

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In New York, the question of where to bring collected organic material is unresolved. The city has a request for proposals to build a new composting plant in or close to the city, but until then there aren’t nearby facilities that can handle large amounts. Goldstein, of the NRDC, said that one possibility is to site facilities outside the city or partner with farms in the Catskills — sending the material 75 miles or so is still a huge improvement on the current system, which involves exporting to landfills sometimes many states and hundreds of miles away.

“The city has been really slow in terms of going through this process,” said Christine Datz-Romero, co-founder and executive director of the Lower East Side Ecology Center, which has worked on composting in New York for two decades. “If we wanted a facility here in New York City we should have started that process a long time ago. For building a facility we’re talking years. I see that as the biggest stumbling block because right now we have very limited capacity.”

Should New York and numerous other U.S. cities and towns establish vibrant composting programs, the environmental benefits will be enormous, advocates say. “Ultimately, there’s going to be very little left in the traditional garbage can,” said Goldstein.

POSTED ON 08 Aug 2013 IN Business & Innovation Climate Energy Policy & Politics Sustainability Urbanization Urbanization North America 

COMMENTS


It would have been good to understand about the business model at the composting plant. Compost also emits methane but can be captured - and is the mature compost sold or what is done with it? From an environmental point of view, we should be putting such biomass back into the soil, ultimately.

Posted by Gabrielle on 09 Aug 2013


SHOOTING OURSELVES WITH COMPOSTING! Doesn't anyone realize that we have trapped energy and CO2 in our biowastes that we let escape to keep CC/GW going if we compost. We can apply a KNOWN PROCESS of pyrolysis to dried collected biowastes including separated solids from sewage. Pyrolysis will turn about 50 percent of the carbon into charcoal that we can bury or use as a soil amendment to supply some plant nutrients. That's a reversing of CC/GW action of burning,is it not? So why waste time and money on composting that ends up having biodegrading to reemit trapped CO2 and to lose trapped solar energy?

The other 50 percent or so of carbon in pyrolyzing biowastes distills out from basically closed pyrolysis chamber, and a mix of organic chemicals, much like a light diesel oil, can be collected. The oil can be refined to get the starting chemicals to make drugs, soaps, pesticides, glues, etc.

We are being overloaded on composting as Nature does a lot on her own. While we do need to help her some, getting carried away with composting means adding to CC/GW with a considerable sum of money being wasted to do it.

Our biowastes including collectable sewage solids are our major sustainability resource. It is appalling that Yale's F & E S is wandering around on CC/GW unaware how composting, if done big time, will worsen CC/GW. It seems no one there has any idea about using pyrolysis on our EVER-MOUNTING biowaste messes that may be what buries our children's futures in another 2-3 decades.

James Singmaster, III, Ph.D. UCDavis, 76,
Environmental Chemist, Ret., Fremont, CA

Posted by James Singmaster, III, Ph.D. UCDavis, 76 on 11 Aug 2013


My first comment would be that it's obviously great to recycle, including the food & garden waste from the cities. It's difficult because it requires each family to act properly plus a good logistics and a well-prepared municipal waste company.

Secondly I would like to add that this compost, made of urban food wastes, shall only be used in ornamental gardens which are common in the big cities.

Finally I would like to ask Dr. James Singmaster III if isn't true that the methane emitted from the food & garden waste will be emitted anyway as decomposition will happens before arrival to the processing plant, even if slower as it is mixed with other garbage. (Ps. In the tropics the process is far faster than in temperate climates.)

Dr. Singmaster is also forgetting that the biggest part of the food waste come from plants, which in turn already have been alive and trapping CO2 previously and most be taken into account.

Fans of biodiesel will always talk about it: The sugarcane/corn was already trapping CO2 before they were turned into biofuel. (Ps.I oppose biofuel due to agricultural reasons.)

I believe pyrolysis chambers are good for separated solids from urban sewage and perharps other organic wastes materials (eg.\% Hospital waste) but it is also VERY EXPENSIVE in large scale.

If the logistics is good and the families are decided to help the system it is CHEAPER to compost org.waste materials.

Now that we need a recycling revolution is certain, and logistics is the main problem especially for mega-cities.

Djan Saisse Masson Leal

Posted by Djan Saisse Masson Leal on 14 Aug 2013


It would be interesting to know the cost comparison of composting as a means of carbon dioxide reduction.


Posted by Arthur Paine on 21 Jun 2014


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dave levitanABOUT THE AUTHOR
Dave Levitan is a freelance journalist based in Philadelphia who writes about energy, the environment, and health. His articles have been published by Scientific American, Discover, IEEE Spectrum, Grist, and others. In previous articles for Yale Environment 360, he has written about the potential of self-driving cars and about vehicle-to-grid technology involving electric cars.
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