Sonia Shah is an author and science journalist whose writing has appeared in The Nation, New Scientist, The New York Times and elsewhere. Her third book is The Fever: How Malaria Ruled Humankind for 500,000 Years.

 

More from Sonia Shah

Climate’s Strong Fingerprint In Global Cholera Outbreaks

by sonia shah
For decades, deadly outbreaks of cholera were attributed to the spread of disease through poor sanitation. But recent research demonstrates how closely cholera is tied to environmental and hydrological factors and to weather patterns — all of which may lead to more frequent cholera outbreaks as the world warms.
READ MORE

Turning to Greener Weapons In the Battle Against Malaria

by sonia shah
Insecticides such as DDT have long been used to combat the scourge of malaria in the developing world. But with the disease parasite becoming increasingly adept at resisting the chemical onslaught, some countries are achieving striking success by eliminating the environmental conditions that give rise to malarial mosquitoes.
READ MORE

As Pharmaceutical Use Soars, Drugs Taint Water and Wildlife

by sonia shah
With nearly $800 billion in drugs sold worldwide, pharmaceuticals are increasingly being released into the environment. The “green pharmacy” movement seeks to reduce the ecological impact of these drugs, which have caused mass bird die-offs and spawned antibiotic-resistant pathogens.
READ MORE

Behind Mass Die-Offs, Pesticides Lurk as Culprit

by sonia shah
In the past dozen years, three new diseases have decimated populations of amphibians, honeybees, and — most recently — bats. Increasingly, scientists suspect that low-level exposure to pesticides could be contributing to this rash of epidemics.
READ MORE

The Spread of New Diseases and the Climate Connection

by sonia shah
As humans increasingly encroach on forested lands and as temperatures rise, the transmission of disease from animals and insects to people is growing. Now a new field, known as “conservation medicine,” is exploring how ecosystem disturbance and changing interactions between wildlife and humans can lead to the spread of new pathogens.
READ MORE

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